Computers

Looking Glass holographic display goes 8K

Looking Glass holographic disp...
The Looking Glass 8K delivers 33.2 million pixels across a wide color gamut at 60 Hz
The Looking Glass 8K delivers 33.2 million pixels across a wide color gamut at 60 Hz
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Three generations of Looking Glass display technology
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Three generations of Looking Glass display technology
The Looking Glass 8K delivers 33.2 million pixels across a wide color gamut at 60 Hz
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The Looking Glass 8K delivers 33.2 million pixels across a wide color gamut at 60 Hz
The 32-inch Looking Glass 8K unit has been developed for retail, mapping, medical imaging, and entertainment applications
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The 32-inch Looking Glass 8K unit has been developed for retail, mapping, medical imaging, and entertainment applications
Side profile of the Looking Glass 8K
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Side profile of the Looking Glass 8K
Potential uses for the Looking Glass lightfield technology include holographic communications
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Potential uses for the Looking Glass lightfield technology include holographic communications
The holographic depth of the Looking Glass 8K display can be measured in feet rather than
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The holographic depth of the Looking Glass 8K display can be measured in feet rather than inches

Earlier this year, the Looking Glass Factory launched an all-in-one 3D visualization workstation for business users. Now the company has announced a bigger immersive display with a holographic depth measured in feet rather than inches.

At the heart of the new 32-inch, 7,680 x 4,320 resolution display is the Looking Glass Factory's 45-element light field technology, described as "a true holographic window into another world that can be experienced by groups of up to a dozen people."

The holographic depth of the Looking Glass 8K display can be measured in feet rather than
The holographic depth of the Looking Glass 8K display can be measured in feet rather than inches

The Looking Glass 8K has been developed for retail, mapping, medical imaging, and entertainment applications, and uses a combination of hardware and software to deliver 33.2 million pixels across a 1.07-billion color gamut at 60 Hz. And users don't need to don VR or AR headsets to dive into "full-color stereoscopic 3D scenes that feel as real as our world."

"GE Healthcare’s customers, both hospitals and the patients they care for, daily ask the question ‘what does that x-ray/CT/MRI/ultrasound tell us?'" said R. Scott Rader of GE Healthcare. "Presenting anatomy and disease pathology in 3D on 2D screens happens every day, but being able to share 3D lightfield imagery with a Looking Glass to a clinical care team, residents/fellows, patients, and other allied health care workers is one exciting potential solution to translating seeing to knowing, fast."

The 32-inch Looking Glass 8K unit has been developed for retail, mapping, medical imaging, and entertainment applications
The 32-inch Looking Glass 8K unit has been developed for retail, mapping, medical imaging, and entertainment applications

The first public outing for the Looking Glass 8K unit will be at this week's Digital Content Expo in Japan. And demonstration models are being rolled out to Brooklyn, Hong Kong, San Francisco and Tokyo too.

The Looking Glass Factory says that it's sold thousands of developer kits over the last year, and reports that its advance beta run for the Looking Glass 8K has already sold out. Pre-orders for the next production batch are now open, with delivery scheduled for the northern spring of 2020. For pricing info, you'll need to contact the company direct. The video below has more.

Looking Glass 8K Immersive Display

Source: The Looking Glass Factory

3 comments
Tacky-on
Going with my experience with the RH1, I suspect that 8K footage gives a visible resolution of around 720. the 4K recording the RH1 does ends up with about a 480 resolution. Dont get me wrong, even 420 is impressive on a 6" screen like the Red Hydrogen, but scaled up it probably won't be that impressive. 720 will scale up fairly well. So this could be quite a thing to behold. A lot of the information from the video goes to depth. So that is why its probably misleading to say its 8K Remember, it has to produce a stereo pair of views for each angle of views it claims. So you can do the math and get the real resolution. but again, its not 100% a fair comparison because its more immersive than a 2D view. But it won't be anything like 8K or even 4K. Just guessing, its probably around 720. Someone who knows how to do the math properly can work it out. Definitely it requires dividing the total resolution in pixels by the total angles of views, but I don't know exactly how.
Charles Bosse
Hm, before I saw the sideview I was pretty sure this had to be lenticular 3D, but it looks like it is using the lightfield tech of their cubes. But, then, the cubes are as deep as their apparent images are, so I am not sure how (or if) these screens achieve seemingly much greater depth. It seems pretty certain this isn't diffraction holography (the kind used in photos) but maybe it is a combination of lenticular techniques and light field to achieve greater depth of field without sacrificing the ability to view it from multiple angles.
Signguy
Hmmm, things in foreground & background seem out of focus...better than "normal", but still not perfect.