Bicycles

Convert FF1 transforms into three types of bike

Convert FF1 transforms into th...
The Convert FF1 in Mountain setup
The Convert FF1 in Mountain setup
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The Convert FF1 base frame
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The Convert FF1 base frame
The Convert FF1 in Mountain Pro setup
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The Convert FF1 in Mountain Pro setup
The Convert FF1 Mountain Pro kit
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The Convert FF1 Mountain Pro kit
The Convert FF1 in Road setup
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The Convert FF1 in Road setup
The Convert FF1 Road kit
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The Convert FF1 Road kit
The Convert FF1 in Trekking setup
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The Convert FF1 in Trekking setup
The Convert FF1 Trekking kit
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The Convert FF1 Trekking kit
The Convert FF1 in Mountain setup
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The Convert FF1 in Mountain setup
The Convert FF1 in Road setup
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The Convert FF1 in Road setup
The Convert FF1 in Trekking setup
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The Convert FF1 in Trekking setup

It's not uncommon for avid cyclists to own a mountain bike, a road bike, and a commuter. German company Convert is looking to provide a space-saving alternative, in the form of the FF1. It consists of a frame that accepts different kits to become different types of bike – and the transformation reportedly only takes a few minutes.

At the heart of the FF1 is a 7005 aluminum alloy frame, festooned with a Formula Cura rear hydraulic disc brake and a Shimano XT 8000 drivetrain – that drivetrain consists of a chain, derailleurs, cranks, and three chainrings (26/36/48). Depending on what sort of riding they want to do, users can equip the frame with one of four kits.

The Road kit includes a 3T carbon fiber fork with a front hydraulic brake; 3T drop handlebars with MicroShift bar-end shifters; and brake-rotor-equipped 3T wheels clad in Kenda Kriterium Endurance 700 x 28c tires – the rear wheel is also fitted with a SunRace 11-32 cassette.

The Convert FF1 in Trekking setup
The Convert FF1 in Trekking setup

The Trekking kit (which would work for commuting) instead features a Kinesis aluminum fork; a flat handlebar with Shimano Deore 6000 shifters; and Exal wheels with Kenda Flintridge Pro 700 x 35c tires and an 11-36 cassette.

And then there's the Mountain kit. It includes a 100-mm RockShox Recon RL suspension fork; a flat bar with Deore shifters; plus Exal wheels with Kenda Small Block Eight 27.5 x 2.10 tires and an 11-36 cassette. There's also a fancier Mountain Pro kit, with upgrades consisting of a Formula Thirty Three suspension fork, Shimano XT shifters, and DT Swiss wheels with Kenda Honey Badger 27.5 x 2.20 tires.

According to Convert, installing any one of the kits on the frame takes less than five minutes, and only requires one included tool. This speediness is facilitated by features such as thru-axles on the wheels, a patented system that keeps the bearings from spilling out when the fork is removed, and Formula's SpeedLock system which allows the hydraulic brake hoses to be disconnected without leaking.

The Convert FF1 in Road setup
The Convert FF1 in Road setup

The weight of the frame combined with the different kits sits at approximately 10.5 kg for the Road setup (23 lb), 11.5 kg for the Trekking (25 lb), 13 kg for the Mountain (28 lb) and 12 kg for the Mountain Pro (26 lb).

If you're interested, the frame costs €1,200 (about US$1,361), with prices of the kits ranging from an additional €900 to €1,500 ($1,021 to $1,702). An optional electric-assist system is also available.

Source: Convert (German)

5 comments
sk8dad
Hmmmm. Is the "special tool" just a 5mm allen wrench? Doesn't that pretty much work with all standard bike parts? The "kit" is simply off-the-shelf parts you bolt on. What's the value add? Road and mountain geometry are very different. A frame that is okay at 3 types of riding isn't great any any particular one. Furthermore, what serious mountain biker would want to regress to the front derailleur? What serious road-biker would consider spinning with wide Q-factor MTB cranks? This is akin to providing an indecisive teenager with a hamburger bun and kitting them out with MacDonalds and a Burger King burger kit. Sure it's do-able, but what's the point?
convert.bike
Hey FrankHuang, thanks for your comment on our convert FF1. So what is the point about our concept? Saving space!!! With the convert FF1 any of your additional bikes only consists out of a kit (two wheels, handlebars, a fork and a seat post / seat). You can store these parts easily in a wheelbag consisting out of three chambers. Now imagine you live in a small flat in a big city and you want to own more than one bike - and store it safe. Or if you wanna go on vacation and do not wanna decide which type of bike you wanna take with you ... Of course, with our bike you will not take part at the Tour de France or at any contest like Red Bull rampage ;) But we have shown our bike to many bike enthusiasts and they all were surprised how good the different types / kits work. And how easy, fast and safe the conversion-process is. And you do not need a special tool for it - just a torquey. Hopefully one day you have the chance to ride a convert FF1 and convince yourself how good it actually works! Best regards!
Stomps
I've been doing the quick-change on my Bruce Gordon Rock 'n Road for thirty years now.
Cody Blank
They've created a crappy mtb, a crappy road bike, and a ok commuter. If you're really about saving space you get a 29'r xc mtb and switch the tires and know that you're making sacrifices.
convert.bike
@Cody Blank We created a fairly good XC hardtail in 27,5” (in fact a very good one with the PRO Kit), a good (although bit heavy) entry level road bike and a simply brilliant commuter. On top of that we created a very capable gravel racer and a really enjoyable fitness bike (cause you can mix the parts of those Kits as you please). And because we’re very open minded, we truly accept harsh criticism from everybody => who actually tested our bike in real life and can proof us wrong…