Music

Clip-on device gives unplugged electric guitar a sound boost

Clip-on device gives unplugged...
No wires, no batteries, no headphones - the DelSonix SD28 clip-on sound booster
No wires, no batteries, no headphones - the DelSonix SD28 clip-on sound booster
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No wires, no batteries, no headphones - the DelSonix SD28 clip-on sound booster
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No wires, no batteries, no headphones - the DelSonix SD28 clip-on sound booster
When not in use, the SD28 can be dismantled and packed into a 12-in kraft paper tube for ease of transport
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When not in use, the SD28 can be dismantled and packed into a 12-in kraft paper tube for ease of transport
The DelSonix SD28 will work with electric bass guitars, too
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The DelSonix SD28 will work with electric bass guitars, too
The SD28 comprises an off-the-shelf spring clamp that's attached to an instrument's headstock, a hollowed out wooden tube and a polyester resonator
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The SD28 comprises an off-the-shelf spring clamp that's attached to an instrument's headstock, a hollowed out wooden tube and a polyester resonator
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Noodling away on an unplugged electric guitar is a great way to practice chops any time, day or night. But the raw sound can be a bit disappointing, lacking body and volume. DelSonix says that its clip-on guitar speaker can give a solid body electric a 10 dB sonic boost, which can be directed straight at the player.

The DelSonix SD28 is all analog and is made up of three main components – an off-the-shelf spring clamp that's attached to an instrument's headstock, a hollowed out wooden tube and a polyester resonator. The precision machined tube, or pick-up post, is fashioned from Douglas Fir and has a "specifically designed resonating gap at the bottom." This is held upright on the headstock by the clamp. The square sheet of polyester is folded into a cone shape and positioned to the top of the pick-up post via a shaped base.

The SD28 comprises an off-the-shelf spring clamp that's attached to an instrument's headstock, a hollowed out wooden tube and a polyester resonator
The SD28 comprises an off-the-shelf spring clamp that's attached to an instrument's headstock, a hollowed out wooden tube and a polyester resonator

Vibrations at the headstock caused by player pick action at the business end of the guitar are picked up by the post and leave the resonator at the top as sound waves. The upshot being that the player is treated to a boosted, fatter acoustic guitar-like sound, but not at a volume that's going to have the neighbors calling the authorities.

When not in use, the SD28 can be dismantled and packed into a 12-in (30.5 cm) kraft paper tube for ease of transport.

The DelSonix SD28 is available now for US$26 (plus shipping). Have a look at the video below to see it in action.

Source: DelSonix

DelSonix Clip On Speaker Demo

View gallery - 4 images
10 comments
wle
silly would be totally inaudible
why not just plug in an amp and turn it down? or headphones? or a tiny amp that goes right on the plug..?
wle
JimRD
Pretty cool idea.
Andre66176
wle - Sometimes you just don't have access to electronic amplification. The idea is to utilize electric guitar neck vibrations, which vibrates a lot. There are millions of electronic amplification devices but DelSonix is the first one to do it with non-powered device. You should listed to DelSonix demo videos and audio recording with headphones on. Tiny computer or smart phone speakers are not going to reproduce full frequency and demonstrate loudness boost very well.
MQ
PS. It's not really analog/ue (for the purposes of comparison, though the waveform is natural, hence admittedly analog), It is an acoustic "amplifier".
Analog (electrically) would be a preamp and speaker plugged into the output socket, or an analog microphone allowing amplification (op-amp,transistor, tube based amplification) etc etc. Digital would be a ABC plugged into the same preamp allowing digital recording/processing/amplification/playback.
NB, traditional guitar amps are completely analog also.
Morley Robertson
I really hope nobody is going to spend $26USD on this thing. Anyone with basic woodworking skills could make the post in a few minutes out of scrap hardwood, and the cone could be made of any pliable plastic, such as the neck of a water or milk jug.
Andre66176
Sometimes you don't have access to electronic amplification. Loudness increase of 10 dB is substantial. Human ear can distinguish 1 dB in loudness change and 3 dB is clearly noticed.
flibb
looks like a device to stop your dog scratching it's ears
owlbeyou
Maybe someone with a few power tools can McGyver up something that does what this does, but it is doubtful that it will be as effective, and it may take at least several hours to produce a decent copy...
Note that the wooden shaft is hollow, the bolt and butterfly nut are not metal but plastic, the insert is designed to make a calculated spread in the cone whose edge does not touch the headstock, and the clamp has to be just the right tightness.
Simple, effective, and only 26 bucks. The producer is obviously not greedy.
Andre66176
Yes, the design details are very important. You can nail, an empty tuna can on a stick and get some noise out of it, but to get 10 dB loudness increase and functionality takes design time and a lot of testing.
nedge2k
hmmm...i know what i'm doing with an old Coke bottle and a bit of wood when I get home ;)