Architecture

Double storey container site disguises a modern office space

Double storey container site d...
Double story container site disguises a modern office space designed by Japanese architectural firm, Tomokazu Hayakawa
Double story container site disguises a modern office space designed by Japanese architectural firm, Tomokazu Hayakawa
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Double story container site disguises a modern office space designed by Japanese architectural firm, Tomokazu Hayakawa
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Double story container site disguises a modern office space designed by Japanese architectural firm, Tomokazu Hayakawa
The two shipping containers appear to have been carelessly stacked on top of one another
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The two shipping containers appear to have been carelessly stacked on top of one another
Large hatched door opens out onto the street
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Large hatched door opens out onto the street
The wooden interior walls make the structure earthquake resistant
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The wooden interior walls make the structure earthquake resistant
These two small rooms face in towards each other and are connected via a central exterior courtyard
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These two small rooms face in towards each other and are connected via a central exterior courtyard
The interior walls are painted white to keep the space light and expansive, appropriate for an ever changing gallery space
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The interior walls are painted white to keep the space light and expansive, appropriate for an ever changing gallery space
Construction of the innovative office design took two and half months to complete
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Construction of the innovative office design took two and half months to complete
Second floor office space
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Second floor office space
To create a better use of space, the base container was cut into two parts that are positioned perpendicular to one another
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To create a better use of space, the base container was cut into two parts that are positioned perpendicular to one another
Tomokazu Hayakawa architects treated the exterior facade with a black vanish
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Tomokazu Hayakawa architects treated the exterior facade with a black vanish
Steel staircase leads the way to the upper level
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Steel staircase leads the way to the upper level

Located on the corner of a small alley in Torigoe, Tokyo, one can find two shipping containers that appear to have been carelessly stacked on top of one another. On closer inspection, however, a large rear door opens to reveal a modern office and gallery space that stretches over two levels.

Built using two reclaimed 40 ft (12 m) shipping containers, the inconspicuous 394 sq. ft (36.66 sqm) building is called CC4441 and was designed by Japanese architectural firm, Tomokazu Hayakawa.

To create a better use of space, the base container was cut into two parts that are positioned perpendicular to one another, forming two small rooms that face in towards one another and are connected via a central exterior courtyard. The second container was then placed above the two smaller rooms and is accessible via the exterior staircase.

These two small rooms face in towards each other and are connected via a central exterior courtyard
These two small rooms face in towards each other and are connected via a central exterior courtyard

The exterior facade is treated with a black varnish and the interior shells are lined with timber framing. The wooden interior meant the structure would meet local building requirements while also making it earthquake resistant. The interior walls are painted white to keep the space light and expansive, appropriate for an ever-changing gallery space.

Second floor office space
Second floor office space

Construction of the innovative office design took two and half months to complete, costing ¥13 million (US$127,000) in total.

Source: Tomokazu Hayakawa via Archdaily

3 comments
James Smith
There is a store only a few blocks from me constructed out of two stacked shipping containers, as this article shows. I can easily provide pictures if anyone is interested,
Wombat56
There's been a lot of these projects reusing old shipping containers. By the time you've done all the work of cutting them up, joining them, adding flooring, insulation, windows, wiring etc, is there much price advantage over custom built construction?
pmshah
I have seen on site residential quarters made out from such shipping containers for construction workers in remote locations. This was in Germany some 40 years ago !