Motorcycles

Ducati patents frameless roadbike

Ducati patents frameless roadb...
Clockwise from top left: the 2009 MotoGP Desmosedici GP9, two patent application drawings and recently released see-through illustration of the 2010 MotoGP Desmosedici GP10
Clockwise from top left: the 2009 MotoGP Desmosedici GP9, two patent application drawings and recently released see-through illustration of the 2010 MotoGP Desmosedici GP10
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patent application drawings of the new Ducati patent
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patent application drawings of the new Ducati patent
patent application drawings of the new Ducati patent
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patent application drawings of the new Ducati patent
patent application drawings of the new Ducati patent
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patent application drawings of the new Ducati patent
patent application drawings of the new Ducati patent
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patent application drawings of the new Ducati patent
see-through illustration of the 2010 MotoGP Desmosedici GP10
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see-through illustration of the 2010 MotoGP Desmosedici GP10
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The GP9 steering head
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The GP9 steering head
The GP9 frame with tank and fairing removed
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The GP9 frame with tank and fairing removed
The GP9 frame in detail
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The GP9 frame in detail
Close-up of the GP9 airbox
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Close-up of the GP9 airbox
Clockwise from top left: the 2009 MotoGP Desmosedici GP9, two patent application drawings and recently released see-through illustration of the 2010 MotoGP Desmosedici GP10
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Clockwise from top left: the 2009 MotoGP Desmosedici GP9, two patent application drawings and recently released see-through illustration of the 2010 MotoGP Desmosedici GP10

Last year when we did an extensive feature on Ducati’s motogp carbon fibre semi-monocoque frame, we lauded its groundbreaking technology. Though Casey Stoner’s illness prevented the Desmosedici GP9 from challenging for the title, four wins showed it to be worth our plaudits. Now it seems Ducati is so pleased with its handiwork that the semi-monocoque design looks set to replace Ducati’s trademark trellis frame on its road bikes in the future too.

A recent patent application designed to protect Ducati’s GP9 and GP10 design which uses a structural airbox to bolt the steering head to the engine at the front of the motor, and to the sub-frame and swinging arm at the rear. The patent includes several references to roadbikes and production which clearly indicate that the design will be used on roadbikes in the future.

The main benefits of the frame are lower weight (a saving of at least five kilograms is envisaged over the existing road bike frames), greater rigidity, and greater design freedom.

The patent application can be found here.

7 comments
PeteN95
This looks like a Britten with a conventional fork? Not completely original.
ihateorange
Only 20 something years years after John Britten used a similar design idea on the AERO-D-One which led to the successful Britten V1000 racer!
bannor99
A patented design? We can only hope that it\'s half as innovative as anything built by John Britten, may he rest in peace
Tim DeBell
Yesss......
Penz
Too easy write post that read the entire patent.. The Britten (it was a great project..) its basically different from the Ducati. In this ducati GP bike the frame its the Airbox...or if you prefer the airbox its also the frame and it contain the trottle body, injectors, trumpets, air filter etc etc... this is a brand new concept. there are others bike with the frame fixed to the engine..but not with a carbon fiber monocoque like this. anyway.. may John rest in peace.
jlbzx6r
The Britten was first with this concept!
moriarty
go and have a look at Quantel Cosworth - 1986 http://next.blog.ocn.ne.jp/.shared/image.html?/photos/uncategorized/2010/03/24/0315.jpg how did Ducati manage to patent it?