Photography

DxO One lets your iPhone take DSLR-like photos

DxO One lets your iPhone take ...
The DxO One works with iPhone 5 and up
The DxO One works with iPhone 5 and up
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A front view of the DxO One
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A front view of the DxO One
The DxO One works with iPhone 5 and up
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The DxO One works with iPhone 5 and up
The DxO One can be used for selfies
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The DxO One can be used for selfies
A back view of the DxO One
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A back view of the DxO One
Images are stored in RAW format on the DxO One's own microSD card, although jpegs can also be saved on the phone's camera roll and then shared via social media
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Images are stored in RAW format on the DxO One's own microSD card, although jpegs can also be saved on the phone's camera roll and then shared via social media
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Your DSLR may take great photos, but it's a hassle to carry around. Your smartphone is easy to carry, but its photos aren't as good. What do you do? Well, you'll soon have the option of using the DxO One. It's a pocket-sized "DSLR-quality" camera that uses its own lens and sensor to take pictures, but utilizes your iPhone or iPad as its viewfinder and control panel.

The One features an aluminum body, a 32-mm equivalent aspheric lens with a variable six-blade iris, and a 1-inch 20.2-MP CMOS BSI sensor. Using the free iOS app, users can adjust its iris from F/1.8 to F/11, vary its shutter speed from 15s to 1/8000s, and select an ISO ranging from 100 to 51200.

It also offers a variety of shooting modes, including full auto and full manual, and 1080p/30fps or 720p/120fps video. Worth noting, however, is the fact that it only has a 3x digital zoom.

Images are stored in RAW format on the DxO One's own microSD card, although jpegs can also be saved on the phone's camera roll and then shared via social media
Images are stored in RAW format on the DxO One's own microSD card, although jpegs can also be saved on the phone's camera roll and then shared via social media

The camera plugs into the iPhone's Lightning port, and can swivel around relative to the phone – this allows users to see the screen while holding the camera/phone at high or low angles (and yes, it also lets them take selfies). Power is provided by an onboard lithium-ion battery, one charge of which should be good for 200 photos.

Images are stored in RAW format on the One's own microSD card, although jpegs can also be saved on the phone's camera roll and then shared via social media. It's additionally possible to shoot in DxO's SuperRAW format, in which four RAW frames are captured in quick succession, then subsequently merged into one image on a Mac or PC.

DxO is now taking preorders for the One, with shipping expected to begin in September. It's priced at US$599. For another take on a smartphone-supported camera, check out Sony's QX line.

Source: DxO

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4 comments
Keith Reeder
If ever there was a product that didn't need to exist...
We've been talking about this on the DxO forum, and I've yet to hear a single good argument for it: as you say, it's hardly different in principle to Sony's (dead in the water) effort; or the Relonch.
The issues are the same: if I want a smartphone-sized camera, I'll use my smartphone. If I want something more like a "proper" camera, I'll use a proper camera.
Vitaly
Mechanically flawed solution. Big module all hangs on Lightning Connector.
pmshah
I had a similar plug in camera for my Casio PDA some 20 years ago. It could be rotated 180 degrees to take selfies AND would invert the image so what one viewed on the screen was always right side up.
So what else is new ??????
Battlespeed
I might be down for something like this based on its size. There's no "proper camera" (as someone put it) with these capabilities (especially 720p at 120 fps) that I could put in my pocket.