Urban Transport

High-speed gondolas envisioned for New York City

The East River Skyway proposal, by developer CityRealty
The East River Skyway proposal, by developer CityRealty
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The East River Skyway proposal, by developer CityRealty
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The East River Skyway proposal, by developer CityRealty
The East River Skyway would offer NYC residents a bird's-eye commute
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The East River Skyway would offer NYC residents a bird's-eye commute
According to developer CityRealty, the gondolas could transport roughly 5,000 travelers per hour
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According to developer CityRealty, the gondolas could transport roughly 5,000 travelers per hour
The first phase of the project would involve connecting the waterfront area in Williamsburg to Downtown Manhattan, South Williamsburg and the Brooklyn Navy Yard
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The first phase of the project would involve connecting the waterfront area in Williamsburg to Downtown Manhattan, South Williamsburg and the Brooklyn Navy Yard
A journey from Brooklyn to Queens would take no longer than 12 minutes
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A journey from Brooklyn to Queens would take no longer than 12 minutes
A journey from Williamsburg to Manhattan would take just four minutes
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A journey from Williamsburg to Manhattan would take just four minutes
The East River Skyway is still a concept rather than a definite plan at this stage
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The East River Skyway is still a concept rather than a definite plan at this stage

A plan is afoot to ease the congestion of New York City's existing transportation infrastructure with a cable car system similar to London's Emirates Air Line. The East River Skyway proposal envisions a high-speed urban gondola that would offer commuters swift transport between Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens, reducing travel times and providing a great view of New York City's skyline.

According to developer CityRealty, the gondolas could transport roughly 5,000 travelers per hour and reduce traveling time for Brooklyn residents commuting to Manhattan by up to 30 minutes. Brooklyn to Queens would take no longer than 12 minutes, and Williamsburg to Manhattan would take just four minutes. The ride would also offer choice 360-degree views of New York City's skyline, so could attract some tourists too.

"Given the exciting growth in Brooklyn and Queens, it is essential to adapt New York City’s transportation system to serve residents in these booming areas," says Daniel Levy, president of East River Skyway and CityRealty. "Cities around the globe are recognizing the viability and efficiency of urban gondolas to overcome serious transportation challenges. An aerial transportation system would be a relatively inexpensive and quickly-deployable solution here in New York."

The East River Skyway would offer NYC residents a bird's-eye commute
The East River Skyway would offer NYC residents a bird's-eye commute

The East River Skyway is still just a proposal at present, and we've no hard data available, but the developers assert that building a gondola system would prove more cost-effective and less environmentally destructive than the massive work that goes into creating underground tunnels. The gondolas also wouldn't put out any harmful emissions.

If the project does go ahead, the first phase would involve connecting the waterfront area in Williamsburg to Downtown Manhattan, South Williamsburg and the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Further phases haven't been decided yet but could include extending the gondola system north to Greenpoint Landing, Long Island City and Midtown East, and south to Dumbo and the South Street Seaport.

Those interested in voicing their support to the proposal or keeping abreast of updates can visit the source link below.

Source: East River Skyway

A plan is afoot to ease the congestion of New York City's existing transportation infrastructure with a cable car system similar to London's Emirates Air Line. The East River Skyway proposal envisions a high-speed urban gondola that would offer commuters swift transport between Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens, reducing travel times and providing a great view of New York City's skyline.

According to developer CityRealty, the gondolas could transport roughly 5,000 travelers per hour and reduce traveling time for Brooklyn residents commuting to Manhattan by up to 30 minutes. Brooklyn to Queens would take no longer than 12 minutes, and Williamsburg to Manhattan would take just four minutes. The ride would also offer choice 360-degree views of New York City's skyline, so could attract some tourists too.

"Given the exciting growth in Brooklyn and Queens, it is essential to adapt New York City’s transportation system to serve residents in these booming areas," says Daniel Levy, president of East River Skyway and CityRealty. "Cities around the globe are recognizing the viability and efficiency of urban gondolas to overcome serious transportation challenges. An aerial transportation system would be a relatively inexpensive and quickly-deployable solution here in New York."

The East River Skyway would offer NYC residents a bird's-eye commute
The East River Skyway would offer NYC residents a bird's-eye commute

The East River Skyway is still just a proposal at present, and we've no hard data available, but the developers assert that building a gondola system would prove more cost-effective and less environmentally destructive than the massive work that goes into creating underground tunnels. The gondolas also wouldn't put out any harmful emissions.

If the project does go ahead, the first phase would involve connecting the waterfront area in Williamsburg to Downtown Manhattan, South Williamsburg and the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Further phases haven't been decided yet but could include extending the gondola system north to Greenpoint Landing, Long Island City and Midtown East, and south to Dumbo and the South Street Seaport.

Those interested in voicing their support to the proposal or keeping abreast of updates can visit the source link below.

Source: East River Skyway

16 comments
Darkoneko
My instinctive reaction is : how strong can the wind be in the NYC area ? Wouldn't want to be in one of those on a bad day.
BigGoofyGuy
I think that would be a cool way to get around New York City. It might be a reason for those to visit NYC. I think it would be cool if there was one to New Jersey so the traffic coming and going to / from New Jersey could be lessened.
Chevypower
I have a more practical solution. Don't live in an overcrowded city. Seriously, people need to spread out more. Everyone's getting in each other's way and annoying each other.
zevulon
high speed nonsense is spewing out of the mouth of this website. source: new yorker who used to take the tram to roosevelt island regularly. trams are slow expensive garbage that load and unload slow as hell. but they do give a great view over the river... the only way something this stupid will get done is with massive corrupt payoffs, which means the politicians have to work very hard to convince the public that this isn't the stupidest idea ever. as stupid as the nyc public is, they woudlnt' fall for this kind of idiocy. for that kind of stupid , you need to go to california. how else do you think they paid billions of dollars for a high speed train that will never ever get built/opened.
Little T.
NYC already has a Tramway installed, it's called the Roosevelt Island Tramway. Maybe the MTA should work on the G, L and F lines before putting more commuters in the air.
Slowburn
Where would the power to operate the gondolas come from, moving the emission source does not remove it. @ Chevypower The dense city is energy efficient even if it is not for you.
JPAR
5,000 passengers per hour.... well that's really going to make a difference!
Rann Xeroxx
I just envision these with all that graffiti we see on the rail cars coming out of Detroit.
jerryd
Good idea. Takes low amount of materials to build. cost to run, little clean power needed to run vs a bridge, tunnel as almost no friction other than ball bearing metal pulleys except the drive ones. Once going close to capacity just add more. And it'll be a great hit with tourists and locals just for the views besides commuters .
Capt82
This concept is about 15 years old. It has been presented before in NYC. Nothing new here.