Architecture

Eiffel Tower's green makeover continues with wind turbine addition

Eiffel Tower's green makeover ...
The two turbines are located above the second floor, some 121 m (400 ft) high (Photo: UGE)
The two turbines are located above the second floor, some 121 m (400 ft) high (Photo: UGE)
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The turbines were hoisted into place with ropes (Photo: UGE)
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The turbines were hoisted into place with ropes (Photo: UGE)
UGE painted the turbines to match the tower, and judging from the photos, their design looks to fit in nicely with the overall design of the tower (Photo: UGE)
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UGE painted the turbines to match the tower, and judging from the photos, their design looks to fit in nicely with the overall design of the tower (Photo: UGE)
The two turbines are located above the second floor, some 121 m (400 ft) high (Photo: UGE)
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The two turbines are located above the second floor, some 121 m (400 ft) high (Photo: UGE)
UGE reports that the turbines will produce over 10,000kWh per year of electricity (Photo: UGE)
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UGE reports that the turbines will produce over 10,000kWh per year of electricity (Photo: UGE)

Last year we reported on the ongoing sustainable makeover of the Eiffel Tower's first-floor. Work continues on turning the tower green, and as part of this process, New York's Urban Green Energy (UGE) recently installed two wind turbines that should reduce the carbon footprint of the iconic landmark.

The two turbines – a couple of VisionAIR5 vertical axis wind turbines to be precise – were installed in partnership with the Société d’Exploitation de la Tour Eiffel (SETE), the body responsible for maintaining the Eiffel Tower. Located above the second floor, some 121 m (400 ft) off the ground, the turbines should be well situated to harness the prevailing wind. The engineering team was required to hoist them into place with ropes.

The turbines were hoisted into place with ropes (Photo: UGE)
The turbines were hoisted into place with ropes (Photo: UGE)

UGE expects the turbines to produce over 10,000 kWh per year. Though this won't be sufficient to cover the Eiffel Tower's entire electricity needs, the firm reckons it should reduce the grid-based requirements of the first floor's commercial spaces by a significant amount.

Naturally, if you're going to tinker with the appearance of one of Europe's most iconic examples of architecture, you'll want to tread carefully. With this in mind, UGE painted the turbines to match the tower, and judging from the photos, they seem to fit in quite well with the overall design of the tower.

Source: UGE

6 comments
ivan4
I have to question the reason for this expenditure when you consider that approximately 79% of Frances electricity is from nuclear reactors - no CO2 emissions - Hydro accounts for almost 14 % - again no CO2 emissions, the odd 7% comes from such things as solar and wind turbines backed by fast reserve gas turbines.. I would also like to see their measured wind speed figures at the turbines sites because the turbulence is going to be something horrible considering these are inside the tower framework.
Milton
I agree with a lot of what ivan is saying in regards to questioning the efficiency of placing such a turbine in the center of a structure. But something tells me its more something to look at than something to work. That being said, I see nothing wrong with bringing more attention to renewable energy.
owlbeyou
This can't be a much needed energy source. It's one more good reason to get people to come and see the tower and think about renewable energy. I'm pleased to see that the turbines have a vertical axis, but since it will be built within an existing structure, the base of the axis could have been reduced considerably by joining the blade mechanism at its top as well. Painting and building it inside to blend in with the tower is thoughtful and avoids any clash. At first glance I was wondering if this was an ill-conceived idea, but I definitely endorse this concept.
Mark Keller
Always wondered if this could be done with the many high power electric wire towers all over the country.
charizzardd
I'm sorry but this is ridiculous, all for renewables but the tower is an iconic building and a piece of art in it's own right. It is one of the most visited and well known pieces of architecture in the ENTIRE WORLD. Why not build some solar into the park surrounding the area or something along those lines. Bury a fuel cell underground or something... For 10,000 kwh? That's less than an average US home uses in a year. So we are marring the Eiffel Tower with wind turbines to add a fairly negligible amount of energy, to what make a point that renewable energy is good and in a country with a very small carbon footprint to begin with. Oi vey, the world frightens me sometimes.
saveenergy
The first floor includes a 130 seat conference venue with full catering, several Buffets, a 200 seat restaurant, a souvenir shop and exhibits about the history of the tower, open for 14hrs/day. http://www.toureiffel.paris/images/images/premier-etage/1er-etage-plan.jpg VisionAIR5 Turbine Max Generator UL Rated = 3.2 kW Average output = 2.5 kW (that’s less than a kettle + a microwave) http://www.urbangreenenergy.com/products/visionair/specifications They claim “the 2 turbines are capable of delivering 10,000kWh of electricity annually” - BUT - The Eiffel Tower consumes 7.8 million kWh of electricity per year (the equivalent of a small village), including 580,000 kWh for all its lights and 705,000 kWh of heating and air conditioning are also required every year, + cooking , 9 lifts & water pumps for 60,000 m3 of drinking water, etc. The monument also uses 20,000 lamps‘to make it sparkle every night’, for 10 minutes on the hour. Even Jan Gromadzki, an engineer with the New York-based Urban Green Technology (the company was tasked with designing and installing the turbines), said “It’s just a small drop in the ocean.” “This installation is definitely more symbolic,” Read more: http://thelibertarianrepublic.com/france-ruined-eiffel-tower-wind-turbines/#ixzz3TaY8xJLz & http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/france/9444530/Eiffel-Tower-goes-green.html Do the maths….You would need 1,560 of these units to power the tower….IF the wind was blowing!!