Automotive

Fiat blends the utility vehicle, pickup and sedan in its FCC4 concept

The all-new Fiat FCC4 design study debuted in Brazil last month
The all-new Fiat FCC4 design study debuted in Brazil last month
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Fiat presents the FCC4 design study
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Fiat presents the FCC4 design study
The Fiat looks like a small pickup momentarily, but the "fastback glass" keeps it from being one
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The Fiat looks like a small pickup momentarily, but the "fastback glass" keeps it from being one
A mash-up of crossover, large sedan and ute
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A mash-up of crossover, large sedan and ute
Fiat doesn't provide a hint as to what it envisions powering a vehicle like the FCC4
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Fiat doesn't provide a hint as to what it envisions powering a vehicle like the FCC4
As Fiat describes it, the FCC4 has "unprecedented and surprising proportions, with dynamic lines, muscular surfaces and reduced glass area"
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As Fiat describes it, the FCC4 has "unprecedented and surprising proportions, with dynamic lines, muscular surfaces and reduced glass area"
Fiat shows the FCC4 at the São Paulo International Motor Show
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Fiat shows the FCC4 at the São Paulo International Motor Show
The all-new Fiat FCC4 design study debuted in Brazil last month
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The all-new Fiat FCC4 design study debuted in Brazil last month
Not your average Fiat, the FCC4 experiments with new form and design language
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Not your average Fiat, the FCC4 experiments with new form and design language

"A real four door coupe with an adventurous spirit" is the description Fiat provides for its new FCC4 design study. We call it more of a CUV with pickup car-like tendencies. Or maybe just weird. Step inside and see what was on Fiat's mind when penning this strangely shaped vehicle.

Prepared for this year's São Paulo Motor Show by Fiat Design Center Latam, the FCC4 experiments with a hybrid design ethic that spans several styles of vehicle. It starts off simply enough, as the front three quarters take on the role of a sedan set high off the ground to shoot over top any jutting ground hazards below.

Things get stranger in back. From the side, the flat rear quarter and squared-off tail create the appearance of a small pickup bed. This isn't too shocking, given the design is modeled for Brazil, where the ute is a force. However, when your eyes wander up, you notice that there's a set-in rear windshield preventing that square end from working as a bed.

Fiat doesn't really explain why it decided to give us the look of a pickup car without the pickup, outside of saying that the design experiments with "unprecedented and surprising proportions." We might warm to the design more if the glass were hooked up to a retraction system, similar to the one on the Magna Steyr MILA Coupic, letting the owner put that bed-style rear-end to use. But when used solely as a styling element, we can't rouse much enthusiasm.

Fiat shows the FCC4 at the São Paulo International Motor Show
Fiat shows the FCC4 at the São Paulo International Motor Show

Moving on from the bulky backside, the FCC4 has a thoughtfully styled front-end that appears to be swooping in to a single point located about five feet in front of the bumper. That look is created by the hood curvature and compact grille. The windshield glass wraps seamlessly around to the side windows, courtesy of the minimized A-pillars, and looks almost as though it ducks below the raised C-pillars to meet up with the rear windshield. The roof enjoys a sporty tilt up until it abruptly gives way to the mash-up rear. The high, squarish wheel arches add a bit more utility vehicle flair.

The 196.9 x 76.4 x 63-in (5,000 x 1,940 x 6,000 mm) FCC4 is painted in metallic blue. It includes LED daytime running lamps and taillights.

Source: Fiat

5 comments
Gadgeteer
With the high hood and beltline, visibility through the greenhouse is going to be pretty bad. With 3D renderings and virtual reality able to make models come to life in computers nowadays, I really don't understand why auto manufacturers waste so much money building completely impractical show cars nowadays. Prototypes that might conceivably become production cars, sure, but building cars that push the envelope in directions that would have to be abandoned to enter the real world make no sense.
Mel Tisdale
@ Gadgeteer Many of these concept vehicles are not vehicles at all, they are made of sculptured clay on a plywood base, with existing mechanicals (wheels, suspensions etc.) bolted on as required. Their role in life is mostly not to influence the engineering of new models but to liven up motor-show stands and give the petrolheads something to argue over.
Alf Balf
strange arithmeics concerning the dimensions.. 5x6 m indeed! I wonder if I'm the only one finding those "sporting" SUVs disgusting and ridicoulous.. it's like grfting the upper third of a camaro on the 4/5 of a 1950 ford pickup, as if concern for aerodynamics only matters at the top... stupid toys for badly weaned brats, and a perfect setup for mobile-phone-users-while-driving blondes to be seen in! what hapened to the Italian flair?
Riaanh
@Alf, no you are not the only one. When I first saw the BMW X6 for example I was really disgusted. Strange is the consumer craving for size. Even the Mini's are becoming Maxi's.
Mike Lawson
Just another vehicle trying to be so many things to so many people, it doesn't come off as being any one thing at all- except ugly and impractical.
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