Automotive

Tesla Model 3 puts in five-star crash test performance

Tesla Model 3 puts in five-sta...
Tesla, and electric cars in general, have some advantages over ICE-powered vehicles when it comes to crash safety
Tesla, and electric cars in general, have some advantages over ICE-powered vehicles when it comes to crash safety
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For all its production struggles and record losses, Tesla has an impressive record when it comes to crash testing
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For all its production struggles and record losses, Tesla has an impressive record when it comes to crash testing
The NHTSA tests vehicles in a number of ways
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The NHTSA tests vehicles in a number of ways
A new round of crash testing by the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) put Tesla's Model 3 sedan through its paces
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A new round of crash testing by the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) put Tesla's Model 3 sedan through its paces
Tesla, and electric cars in general, have some advantages over ICE-powered vehicles when it comes to crash safety
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Tesla, and electric cars in general, have some advantages over ICE-powered vehicles when it comes to crash safety
Tesla's Model 3 has aced a round of crash testing by the NHTSA
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Tesla's Model 3 has aced a round of crash testing by the NHTSA
Elon Musk seems pretty optimistic about how his mass market sedan will fare in crash testing when the final results come in
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Elon Musk seems pretty optimistic about how his mass market sedan will fare in crash testing when the final results come in

Much is said about the safety of Tesla vehicles and the role of the company's Autopilot software in traffic incidents, but there can be little doubt about the top-level protection the cars offer in the event of a collision. A new round of crash testing by the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) put the company's Model 3 sedan through its paces, finding it performed impressively across all categories.

For all its production struggles and record losses, Tesla has an impressive record when it comes to crash testing. In 2013, the NHTSA awarded its Model S an overall five-star rating, and last year the Model X became the first SUV to earn a five-star rating across the board.

As you can see in the video from CrashNet1 below, the NHTSA tests these vehicles in a number of ways, including frontal impacts that simulate head-on collisions between vehicles traveling at 35 mph (56 km/h), side impacts simulating crashes into stationary barriers and poles, and the likelihood of the vehicle rolling over. In testing the rear-wheel drive Model 3, the NHTSA found it performed at a five-star level in all aspects, with a rollover resistance rating of 6.6 percent.

A new round of crash testing by the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) put Tesla's Model 3 sedan through its paces
A new round of crash testing by the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) put Tesla's Model 3 sedan through its paces

Tesla, and electric cars in general, have some distinct advantages over internal combustion engine-powered vehicles when it comes to crash safety. With the motor mounted near the rear axle rather than in the hood, the front end of the vehicle becomes a generous crumple zone to soak up the impact in the event of a head-on collision. This, and the battery pack built into the bottom of the vehicle, also contribute to a low center of gravity, reducing the likelihood of the car rolling over.

As CEO Elon Musk pointed out on Twitter, there is more to crash testing than generalized ratings out of five. The NHTSA also calculates the probability of injury to the occupants, figures that are still forthcoming, though Musk seems pretty optimistic about how his mass market sedan will fare.

Elon Musk seems pretty optimistic about how his mass market sedan will fare in crash testing when the final results come in
Elon Musk seems pretty optimistic about how his mass market sedan will fare in crash testing when the final results come in

You can see footage from the testing below.

Source: NHTSA

Tesla Model 3 (2018) Frontal Crash Test

Much is said about the safety of Tesla vehicles and the role of the company's Autopilot software in traffic incidents, but there can be little doubt about the top-level protection the cars offer in the event of a collision. A new round of crash testing by the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) put the company's Model 3 sedan through its paces, finding it performed impressively across all categories.

For all its production struggles and record losses, Tesla has an impressive record when it comes to crash testing. In 2013, the NHTSA awarded its Model S an overall five-star rating, and last year the Model X became the first SUV to earn a five-star rating across the board.

As you can see in the video from CrashNet1 below, the NHTSA tests these vehicles in a number of ways, including frontal impacts that simulate head-on collisions between vehicles traveling at 35 mph (56 km/h), side impacts simulating crashes into stationary barriers and poles, and the likelihood of the vehicle rolling over. In testing the rear-wheel drive Model 3, the NHTSA found it performed at a five-star level in all aspects, with a rollover resistance rating of 6.6 percent.

A new round of crash testing by the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) put Tesla's Model 3 sedan through its paces
A new round of crash testing by the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) put Tesla's Model 3 sedan through its paces

Tesla, and electric cars in general, have some distinct advantages over internal combustion engine-powered vehicles when it comes to crash safety. With the motor mounted near the rear axle rather than in the hood, the front end of the vehicle becomes a generous crumple zone to soak up the impact in the event of a head-on collision. This, and the battery pack built into the bottom of the vehicle, also contribute to a low center of gravity, reducing the likelihood of the car rolling over.

As CEO Elon Musk pointed out on Twitter, there is more to crash testing than generalized ratings out of five. The NHTSA also calculates the probability of injury to the occupants, figures that are still forthcoming, though Musk seems pretty optimistic about how his mass market sedan will fare.

Elon Musk seems pretty optimistic about how his mass market sedan will fare in crash testing when the final results come in
Elon Musk seems pretty optimistic about how his mass market sedan will fare in crash testing when the final results come in

You can see footage from the testing below.

Source: NHTSA

Tesla Model 3 (2018) Frontal Crash Test

5 comments
Mallysh
Just want to know, if they emptied the battery before? Lithium-Ions have a high risk of bursting into flames when fully charged and I hope they did the testing with full battery. If not it is a faked test....
fb36
And I just want to know, if they empty the gas tank, before gasoline car crash tests? If not, then all those crash tests are faked tests!
fb36
I wonder, if there was ever a single person in an electric car who got electrocuted, after an accident, or not? (I really don't know!) But, how many people ever got stuck in a gasoline car, and burned to dead alive, on the other hand, (and they still do!)? And, also, what would happen, if hydrogen cars replaced gasoline cars (instead of electric cars replacing gasoline cars), in the future, (like many car companies obviously seem to really really want/prefer!)?
ljaques
Wow! This article brought the loons out, eh? Good designs, Elon. Kudos on the triple 5 scores!
Mallysh
for leaking fuel you still need a spark. those batteries just need to be charged and mix their fluids due to mechanical damage to explode. no spark or flame needed. But yes, I also hope they have fluids in gasoline cars to see if the tank is leaking...