Bicycles

Rider-dangling bike enters limited production

Inventor David Schwartz's son Daniel shows us the Flying Rider at Interbike
Inventor David Schwartz's son Daniel shows us the Flying Rider at Interbike
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The first production model of the Flying Rider, at Interbike 2014
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The first production model of the Flying Rider, at Interbike 2014
An initial run of 100 bikes will be produced
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An initial run of 100 bikes will be produced
The claimed weight is 20 pounds
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The claimed weight is 20 pounds
Inventor David Schwartz's son Daniel shows us the Flying Rider at Interbike
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Inventor David Schwartz's son Daniel shows us the Flying Rider at Interbike
The upper part of the frame is intended to keep the rider's back from bobbing up and down as they pedal
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The upper part of the frame is intended to keep the rider's back from bobbing up and down as they pedal
The original Flying Rider prototype
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The original Flying Rider prototype

Remember the Flying Rider? It was a prototype bike we covered in June, in which the rider hung from a harness instead of sitting on a saddle. The idea was that the padded overhanging part of the frame would keep the rider’s back from bobbing up and down as they pedaled, allowing that blocked vertical motion to be converted into increased leverage on the pedals. Well, despite the fact that a number of our readers thought the whole thing was a little questionable, it’s now going into production.

This Thursday we caught up with California-based architect and engineer David Schwartz, who designed the Flying Rider, at the Interbike 2014 trade show in Las Vegas. He told us that he will initially be producing 100 of the bikes, which he is hoping to sell through bike shops – they won’t be sold direct.

The carbon fiber frames are being manufactured in Edmonton, Canada by Dynamic Composites, which has previously built disk wheels and aero helmets for the Canadian National Cycling Team. Schwartz will then be outfitting the frames with a variety of components, including a Shimano 105 drivetrain. The weight of the complete bike is a claimed 20 pounds (9 kg).

The first production model of the Flying Rider, at Interbike 2014
The first production model of the Flying Rider, at Interbike 2014

Buyers, or the bike shops, will have to supply their own rock climbing-type harness.

If you think the Flying Rider might be for you, its suggested retail price is US$4,770 for the full bike or $2,462 for the frame and fork only. Depending on how much interest he receives from dealers at Interbike, David’s hoping to have bikes in select stores by the end of this month.

Source: Flying Rider

10 comments
Slowburn
Just proving that there is no idea so stupid it won't find somebody to pay for it.
Mel Tisdale
I assume that the shops he has selected to sell this item have a 'sale or return' contract. In the meantime, Mr Schwartz can get ahead of the game by thinking of ways he can recycle 100 returned Flying Rider bikes. Perhaps fitting a saddle might be one way.
Jon Smith
I'm speechless, this design is just ludicrous and potentially dangerous as well... I just don't know what the hell this guy is thinking.
wle
amazing dumbest bike ever
Stuart Wilshaw
A totally pointless and stupid idea. Cyclists are already unprotected in the event of an accident, if involved in an accident with this the rider may well suffer far more serious injury from the frame than they would if thrown of an ordinary bike.
StWils
Damn near 5K for a bike that the new (And Stupid, ) owner has to add an essential harness just to get going? This is still an incredibly bad idea. This unsafe gadget shows how completely a true believer can be blind to their own delusions. If this bike thing does not work out maybe he could start on a 12 step recovery by running for something on the Tea Party or Libertarian platform. Late Night Standup needs fresh material all the time.
rdlongview
I thought it was weird too, till I remembered all the people who have lower back pain that may be helped by some light suspension and stretching therapy excercize of that area of the back.
Marc Stinebaugh
Why? No! What a terrible idea. Do not use that idea. This should never see ANY production. Ew. God no.
Daniel Humphries
I think make it longer, lower and fully faired. Totally re-jigged with smaller front wheel and you have a contender for a human powered speed record. As in create a position that is akin to the sprint position with continuos comfortable support. Maximum power output and maximum aerodynamics is where our highest possible speed will be achieved.
anglykos
This is a revolutionary construction that has the added benefit of dispensing with expensive saddles, side-stands and locks. After the end of a fascinating ride all the human pendulum has to do is turn it upside down and presto! it can be left standing on its head. And consider the added benefit of not having a saddle that can be stolen, and bike aesthetics that guarantee that noone will want to steal it in any case.