Science

Mmm, glow-in-the-dark jellyfish ice cream

Mmm, glow-in-the-dark jellyfis...
It glows when licked, and presumably doesn't taste like jellyfish
It glows when licked, and presumably doesn't taste like jellyfish
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It glows when licked, and presumably doesn't taste like jellyfish
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It glows when licked, and presumably doesn't taste like jellyfish

Late last month, as a definitely unique way of celebrating Hallowe'en, Bristol-based specialty ice cream-maker Charlie Harry Francis unveiled what is probably the world's first-ever glow-in-the-dark ice cream. His secret ingredient? Jellyfish protein.

The ice cream had actually been in the works for several months, ever since Francis and his team discovered that "this amazing scientist from China" had synthesized the luminescence protein from jellyfish.They ordered some, and made ice cream with it.

The protein is reportedly activated by the calcium in the ice cream, and it luminesces when agitated – this means that it glows when you lick it. Francis has tried it, and while there's no word on the flavor, he has stated that he doesn't seem to be glowing anywhere, so he assumes it's safe to eat.

What it isn't, however, is cheap. Due to the cost of the synthetic protein, he figures that each scoop of the ice cream is worth about £140 (US$225). Although he hasn't stated whether or not he plans on making it commercially, it's probably safe to assume that this is a one-off experiment.

Source: Lick Me I'm Delicious via AOL Travel

4 comments
The Skud
At that price, I don't think people will be buying a "McGlow' any time soon ... Still, with production of the protein ramped up, you never know! Would be fantastic sitting with your girl on the porch swing at twilight, don't you think?
Paul Adams
Glow in the dark ice cream, not a batch made in Fukushima is it? Only kidding. Genetically modified cows could give glow in the dark milkshake.
Jay Finke
I like two scoops, so at a cost of $450 bucks, it looks like i will need to save up money to enjoy this cool little treat. OR we could settle for the more abundant plankton version
Gregg Eshelman
So it actually glows in the dark instead of fluorescing under ultraviolet light like the "glow in the dark" tobacco plants and mice?