Automotive

Grunner e-bike mixes massive range with punchy performance

The Grunner e-bike has up to 2.2 kW of power 
The Grunner e-bike has up to 2.2 kW of power 
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The specs of the Grunner e-bike
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The specs of the Grunner e-bike
A look at the electric goodies behind the Grunner
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A look at the electric goodies behind the Grunner
The frame of the Grunner e-bike 
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The frame of the Grunner e-bike 
A look inside the battery casing of the Grunner e-bike 
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A look inside the battery casing of the Grunner e-bike 
Grunner will let riders check out their ride stats on a computer 
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Grunner will let riders check out their ride stats on a computer 
The seven-inch touchscreen on the Grunner e-bike
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The seven-inch touchscreen on the Grunner e-bike
The Grunner e-bike has up to 2.2 kW of power 
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The Grunner e-bike has up to 2.2 kW of power 
A prototype Grunner e-bike 
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A prototype Grunner e-bike 
Lights underneath the Grunner e-bike 
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Lights underneath the Grunner e-bike 
The Grunner name is meant to signify Global Runner
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The Grunner name is meant to signify Global Runner
The Grunner's sturdy frame is home to a large battery pack
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The Grunner's sturdy frame is home to a large battery pack

E-bikes offer a way for commuters to arrive at work sweat-free, but some boosted two-wheelers are starting to offer ranges that rival bikes of the fossil fuel-powered variety. One such example is the Grunner developed by Croatia-based Mobile Vehicle Technology and Absolute Design, which boasts 2.2 kW of power and 180 km (112 mi) of range.

Like the most powerful offerings from Stealth and Rimac, the Grunner looks more like a lightweight motorcycle than a regular pushbike. The TIG-welded steel frame is home to a 1.5-kWh lithium-ion battery, housed within composite fairings. It's good for a 180 km (112 mi) range in Eco Mode or 100 km (62 mi) in Power Mode, and takes around 90 minutes to charge from empty.

That significant range disparity is down to the sheer grunt on offer in Power Mode. While the base Eco Mode offers just 250 W of pedal-assistance for a 25 km/h (16 mph) top speed, Power Mode frees up a whopping 2.2 kW. As you might imagine, the bike is street legal in Eco mode and probably not with the full output unlocked. Top speed jumps to 50 km/h (31 mph) with the right switches flicked, which is still less than the Stealth H-52 will do in its most powerful tune.

The seven-inch touchscreen on the Grunner e-bike
The seven-inch touchscreen on the Grunner e-bike

Given you can only (legally) enjoy the full Grunner experience off-road, the bike comes ready for trails. It rides on Rockshox suspension with 200 mm (7.9 in) of travel at the front and a steel-coil setup at the rear, while custom 26-inch wheels are tasked with putting all that power to the road. Given it weighs 25 kg (55 lb) and is capable of 50 km/h, you'll be pleased to know the brakes are suitably powerful Shimano hydraulic units, backed up by a regenerative braking system capable of drawing 1 kW of power.

The rider can control the bike through a seven-inch touchscreen mounted on the handlebars. Along with details about speed, range and riding mode, parents can use the system to lock the bike in a special low power mode for children. All the data captured on a ride is uploaded to the cloud, and can be accessed remotely through the web.

All this performance doesn't come cheap. Pricing will start at €4,000 (US$4,550) – a lot of money for a bike, but still €2,000 ($2,280) cheaper than the Rimac-developed Greyp G-12. It's also around $3,000 cheaper than a Stealth H-52, although that bike has a higher top speed, and drifts even further into the realm of motorbikes. It's set to go on sale by the end of Summer in the Northern Hemisphere.

The video below shows the bike in action.

Source: Grunner Bikes

Grunner Electric Smart Bike

9 comments
ggx32
€4,000 ! What a shame it's beyond the wallet of the masses. Let's hope they can drive the price down to something ordinary people can afford.
Dziks
If they try to sell it I would like to see a production model in pictures. The one shown has some 100mm front suspension and no gears. I wish all the best to the Grunner team but it looks like another "garage" startup.
pmshah
Regardless of the price I don't trust any equipment that connects batteries in parallel. Should one short out it would be another hoverboard type of disaster.
habakak
Why 26 inch wheels? 27.5 and 29 inch wheels are way more efficient and for off-roading provides better roll-over ability. At $5500 it is reasonably priced for what it can do. Mass-producing it could drive the cost down significantly, especially with the cost of batteries dropping so rapidly. This could be a viable form of commuting for millions of people.
VincentWolf
Way too pricey. All of these bike and motorcycle companies are gouging the public thinking the batteries are incredibly expensive. They are not. It's just a scam.
Bob Flint
The batteries get composite fairings, but not a single mud/splash guard over the wheels...Drop the stupid touch screen, and the trip tracking nonsense, ad some fenders, and maybe a storage rack, & cut the price in third, then it will sell...
Cody Blank
Bad geometry, bad components, bad looking, bad price for all that crap. $4500 gets you a MTB e-bike done by Specialized with proper components, proper frame geometry, and a much better looking bike.
Darus Zehrbach
The chassis design shows square tubing - which has very little resistance to twisting compared to round. That is a major flaw. Lack of torsional rigidity would make it evil handling
Stradric
That's a pretty slack head angle on par with a downhill bike, but this is clearly not a downhill bike. The rear hub motor is also a poor choice for a pedelec. It seems better to distribute the weight of the motor through the center of the bike with something like a Bosch system. There are much better options out there for this price IMO. A Trek Supercommuter for commuting or a Specialized Turbo Levo for off-road, for example.
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