Architecture

Hiking cabin withstands extreme weather north of the arctic circle

Hiking cabin withstands extrem...
The Hammerfest Hiking Cabins project actually consists of two cabins, but the second is yet to be completed
The Hammerfest Hiking Cabins project actually consists of two cabins, but the second is yet to be completed
View 13 Images
The Hammerfest Hiking Cabins project actually consists of two cabins, but the second is yet to be completed
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The Hammerfest Hiking Cabins project actually consists of two cabins, but the second is yet to be completed
The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin shown was finished just recently and went well over the original budget, costing around €100,000 (US$113,000)
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The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin shown was finished just recently and went well over the original budget, costing around €100,000 (US$113,000)
The Hammerfest Hiking Cabins project actually consists of two cabins, but the second is yet to be completed
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The Hammerfest Hiking Cabins project actually consists of two cabins, but the second is yet to be completed
The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin was designed by Norway's Spinn Arkitekter and the UK's Format Engineers
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The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin was designed by Norway's Spinn Arkitekter and the UK's Format Engineers
The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin was built following a drone survey of the site and the creation of multiple 3D-printed models to ensure it can withstand extreme weather
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The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin was built following a drone survey of the site and the creation of multiple 3D-printed models to ensure it can withstand extreme weather
The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin is envisioned as both a refuge and destination to enjoy the stunning view
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The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin is envisioned as both a refuge and destination to enjoy the stunning view
The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin is also designed to ensure that no snow builds up at the entrance
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The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin is also designed to ensure that no snow builds up at the entrance
The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin is quite simple and measures a total of 15 sq m (161 sq ft)
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The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin is quite simple and measures a total of 15 sq m (161 sq ft)
The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin includes a wood-burning stove and some basic furniture like seating and tables
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The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin includes a wood-burning stove and some basic furniture like seating and tables
Structurally, the Hammerfest Hiking Cabin consists of CLT (cross-laminated timber) panels and an outer cladding comprising 77 panels that fit together like a puzzle, as well as bitumen waterproofing
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Structurally, the Hammerfest Hiking Cabin consists of CLT (cross-laminated timber) panels and an outer cladding comprising 77 panels that fit together like a puzzle, as well as bitumen waterproofing
To save money, the Hammerfest Hiking Cabin was assembled by local hiking club members – over 1,500 hours of time by volunteers went into its construction
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To save money, the Hammerfest Hiking Cabin was assembled by local hiking club members – over 1,500 hours of time by volunteers went into its construction
"The design proposed by Spinn and Format was something very different than the client expected, and had a higher budget, but they were determined to find a way to get the project built," explains a press release
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"The design proposed by Spinn and Format was something very different than the client expected, and had a higher budget, but they were determined to find a way to get the project built," explains a press release
The second cabin is now planned for 2019 and will soon be installed nearby
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The second cabin is now planned for 2019 and will soon be installed nearby
View gallery - 13 images

Getting caught out in bad weather while commuting is annoying, but doing so while exploring north of the arctic circle is rather more serious. To offer hikers in Norway both a safe refuge and a destination to enjoy the view, Spinn Arkitekter and Format Engineers were commissioned to create a hiker's hut that can withstand nature's worst.

The Hammerfest Hiking Cabins project actually consists of two cabins, the one shown and another not yet completed. Commissioned by the Norwegian Trekking Association, the project went well over the original budget, costing €100,000 (US$113,000) per cabin, underlying just how much effort went into designing it.

"The design proposed by Spinn and Format was something very different than the client expected, and had a higher budget, but they were determined to find a way to get the project built," explains a press release. "A visualization and animation were made as part of a crowdfunding effort to raise the money necessary to realize the project. Local businesses volunteered materials and services, and Kebony donated materials for the exterior cladding."

The almost egg-shaped structure was decided upon following a drone survey of the site and the creation of multiple 3D-printed models to ensure it can withstand extremes in cold and that no snow will build up in the entrance, blocking access.

The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin is quite simple and measures a total of 15 sq m (161 sq ft)
The Hammerfest Hiking Cabin is quite simple and measures a total of 15 sq m (161 sq ft)

To save money, the cabin was assembled by members of the local hiking club – over 1,500 hours of time by volunteers went into its construction – in a warehouse. It was then subjected to "simulated extreme conditions" before being transported into place by truck. Structurally, it consists of CLT (cross-laminated timber) panels and an outer cladding comprising 77 panels of sustainably-sourced treated softwood, as well as bitumen waterproofing.

The interior of the cabin is quite simple and has a total floorspace of 15 sq m (161 sq ft). It includes a wood-burning stove and some basic furniture like seating and tables, all centered around a large window offering views of the town below. The second cabin is now planned for 2019 and will be installed nearby.

Source: Spinn Arkitekter

View gallery - 13 images
5 comments
ADVENTUREMUFFINffin
Beautiful design but why a wood burning stove? Likely to be placed-like the arctic, with no trees nearby. Might super insulation and solar panels be a better alternative?
ADVENTUREMUFFINffin
or perhaps better than a solar collector (being in the extremes of light and dark) a wind generator?
Ralf Biernacki
I am a senior engineer, and I have extensively specified and evaluated commissioned work. Producing results by grossly overshooting the budget (while relying on 1500 hours of donated labor!) and by ignoring customer's spec can hardly be seen as an achievement, however avant-garde the appearance. This is fantasizing not engineering, and any sane customer should reject this---why is the NTA so free with its members' money? Having read this article I would never consider commissioning a project from /Spinn Arkitekter and Format Engineers
Wes79
I agree with the sentiment of "Ralf Biernacki" comments above. This is obscene. I would be embarrassed if I were the design firm and this press release was issued about our project. I would certainly be less likely to hire them if I read it.
Ralf Biernacki
This is a shelter on a hiking trail in the mountains right? So it must be designed for overnight stays---the weather in the mountains changes quickly, so inevitably some hikers will be snowed in, etc. But there is no provision in this design for a place to lay down sleeping bags or any bedding mat: the benches are too narrow, the tables are too short, and the only space available is the middle of the cold hard floor, which will be dirty and wet from hikers tracking in mud or snow. That alone disqualifies the design. Want more? The stove (which for some reason is not shown in the photos, I wonder why) is placed in the worst possible spot, in a nook by the door jammed in between three external walls; it will radiate most heat into these walls, and the remainder will blow out the door every time it is opened. The proper place for the stove should be on the opposite corner from the door. Want more? The benches for sitting are placed under overhanging walls, forcing the sitters to hunch over awkwardly, and making it impossible to sit with a backpack. And there is no good place to put down backpacks either, except in the middle of the floor, see remarks above. As for the two "stools", they are uncomfortable and unstable, and the only thing they are good for is fueling the stove with them. In short, this is an egregiously poor design for a trail shelter. It should have been immediately rejected even if it did fit within budget.