Architecture

The Hush2 shelter can withstand hurricanes

The Hush2 shelter is designed for use in disaster relief areas and can withstand category 5 hurricanes
The Hush2 shelter is designed for use in disaster relief areas and can withstand category 5 hurricanes
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The Hush2 shelter is designed for use in disaster relief areas and can withstand category 5 hurricanes
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The Hush2 shelter is designed for use in disaster relief areas and can withstand category 5 hurricanes
The Hush2 team stand in one of the two rooms into which the shelter is split
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The Hush2 team stand in one of the two rooms into which the shelter is split

Ensuring that people have shelter is a critical part of disaster relief. But what happens if the disaster is ongoing? Or if another disaster hits? A humanitarian shelter from Extremis Technology is designed with just that thinking. The Hush2 can be erected in two hours and can withstand hurricanes.

Two hours is by no means the quickest of assembly times as emergency shelters go. The Rapid Deployment Module from Visible Good, for example, can be assembled without any tools in 25 minutes. Alastair Pryor's Compact Shelter, meanwhile, can be erected in just two minutes, albeit as a much more rudimentary facility. Whilst not as quick to deploy as these examples, the Hush2 is designed to afford more protection to those inside and is transitional to long-term use after a disaster.

The shelter is designed to be highly portable so that it can be transported quickly and easily to disaster relief areas. It is built from marine plywood and can be repaired or enhanced using local materials. It is also designed so that it can be easily repurposed after being used.

The Hush2 team stand in one of the two rooms into which the shelter is split
The Hush2 team stand in one of the two rooms into which the shelter is split

Once constructed, the Hush2 measures 4.3 x 4.4 x 2.4 m (14.1 x 14.4 x 7.9 ft). It is split into two compartments which can be used, for example, as separate living and sleeping spaces. The shelter is also modular and can be deployed in groups to form larger buildings. It is built using noise reduction materials and has a heat deflection coating to help control temperature. It is also possible to install water purification and solar cooking facilities.

Although it looks like a traditional rectangular shelter, the Hush2 has a special party trick. In the event of strong winds or a hurricane, the shelter can be quickly reconfigured into a more sturdy shape to provide extra protection. To adopt the shelter's "storm-safe position," the two sides of each end are folded diagonally inwards and the shelter's sides are also folded inwards to create a triangular shape.

This formation means that the Hush2 maintains a solid base, but reduces wind resistance. It also reinforces parts of the structure and covers the door and windows. Internal space is naturally reduced, although floor space remains the same. According to Extremis Technology, the process of converting the shelter takes just seven minutes and, once complete, the shelter can withstand hurricanes with category 5 winds of up to 200 mph (322 km/h).

The video below shows the Hush2 in action.

Source: Hush2

HuSh2 Deployment Animation

9 comments
Slowburn
0K this one is not a stupid idea but I still think a shipping container packed with supplies make better shelters.
sk8dad
Presumably when inhabitants realize the severity of the storm has exceeded the appropriateness of the "low-wind" configuration, the wind loading on the walls and roof is greater than humanly possible to handle. How does one reconfigure the house then?
Richard Guy
Looks great. How much does it cost?
GScott
CLEVER design. What an interesting, re-purposing building. Could switch out for much lighter materials, and use for camping/ recreation. Looks like it would be easy to tow, especially for weekend retreats (hunters camp/lodge). Instead of origami in wood; it could be made of lighter tent-style materials). Yes - reconfiguring during a storm - not a good idea; but we aren't cavemen - we would know if a hurricane has been upgraded from a Cat 2 to a Cat 5 in more than enough time to change strategies. Also perfect for a "Plan B" during summer storms. Glad there are so many creative ideas out there to use and modify. PS - COSTS on this version????
Benji Roo
Once in storm configuration, I missed the part where the door was accessible. Or maybe the wings are supposed to cover the doors? Great modular design, and I like how the windows disappear in storm configuration. "There is no such thing as a foolproof system. Someone will make a better fool, tomorrow." @LoneWolffe
Griffin
200mph winds? Let me know when they're done testing that..... I want to see some 200mph winds throwing mobile homes, mini-vans,some boats,utility poles large tree trunks,branches at it for an hour or so.... How is it that these geniuses always forget that you aren't just dealing with wind only,but ALSO the DEBRIS IN THE WIND? Wind loads are just the beginning of your problems. You'd better off with a shipping container.... encased in concrete. Extreme flooding makes ALL structures irrelevant as that comes into play.
the.other.will
Shipping containers are fixed volume. Hush2 will fit into a much smaller space than shipping containers of the same floor area. The sloped walls will deflect windblown flying debris. And they're double thickness on the ends, and low to the ground where the heaviest objects will tend to be. They're not meant to substitute for permanent storm structures. They do appear to be a big improvement over tents.
Bob
How is it anchored to the ground to withstand 200 mph winds? Also, it looks like very minimal floor space in the folded configuration. As someone else pointed out flying debris. flood waters and mudslides usually accompany category 5 storms.
Slowburn
@ theotherwill Other supplies than structures are needed in disaster relief and they can be stacked to provide more shelter than just their internal volume.
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