Automotive

Vision G Concept Coupe points to Hyundai's luxury design future

The Hyundai Vision G Concept Coupe points to the design of future luxury Hyundais
The Hyundai Vision G Concept Coupe points to the design of future luxury Hyundais
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The Hyundai Vision G Concept Coupe points to the design of future luxury Hyundais
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The Hyundai Vision G Concept Coupe points to the design of future luxury Hyundais
Hyundai's designers have given the car classic flowing lines
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Hyundai's designers have given the car classic flowing lines
The Hyundai Vision G Concept Coupe
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The Hyundai Vision G Concept Coupe
Hyundai has worked to make the Vision G look understated and classy
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Hyundai has worked to make the Vision G look understated and classy
The long bonnet and high beltline are designed to give off a subtle, luxury feel
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The long bonnet and high beltline are designed to give off a subtle, luxury feel
Inside, the designers have worked to make the car feel luxurious without being too brash
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Inside, the designers have worked to make the car feel luxurious without being too brash
Flowing lines are prominent throughout the interior
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Flowing lines are prominent throughout the interior
Hyundai will show the concept at Pebble Beach
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Hyundai will show the concept at Pebble Beach
The wooden detailing and metal highlights in the Vision G's interior
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The wooden detailing and metal highlights in the Vision G's interior
The Vision G's cabin
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The Vision G's cabin
The Vision G's steering wheel
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The Vision G's steering wheel
It may be a concept, but the Vision G's switchgear looks production ready
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It may be a concept, but the Vision G's switchgear looks production ready
Hyundai has worked hard to make the details look good
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Hyundai has worked hard to make the details look good
The Hyundai's high beltline makes for a sleek windowline
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The Hyundai's high beltline makes for a sleek windowline
The Hyundai Vision G Concept Coupe
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The Hyundai Vision G Concept Coupe
The Hyundai Vision G Concept Coupe
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The Hyundai Vision G Concept Coupe
The Hyundai Vision G Concept Coupe
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The Hyundai Vision G Concept Coupe
Peter Schreyer led the design team
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Peter Schreyer led the design team
The big wheels are the flashiest aspect of the Vision G's design
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The big wheels are the flashiest aspect of the Vision G's design
The Vision G's badge is similar to the one that adorns the front of the Genesis
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The Vision G's badge is similar to the one that adorns the front of the Genesis
Smooth, flowing lines abound on the Hyundai's exterior
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Smooth, flowing lines abound on the Hyundai's exterior
There is more than just a touch of Audi in the Hyundai's grille
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There is more than just a touch of Audi in the Hyundai's grille

Once associated with bargain-basement driveaway prices on boring hatchbacks, in recent times Hyundai has been moving to compete with the best that the Germans and Japanese can offer. The latest indicator of this upmarket move is the Vision G Concept Coupe, which previews the direction for a future line of luxury Hyundais.

While it would certainly turn heads at the local supermarket carpark, Hyundai's designers have made sure the Vision G doesn't shout too loudly. Head designer Peter Schreyer's team has worked to create a sense of understated, classic luxury by giving it a long bonnet and high beltline.

Stepping through the concept's auto-opening doors takes you into an interior that, like the exterior, eschews flashy displays of luxury, instead favoring refined and simple lines.

The Hyundai Vision G Concept Coupe
The Hyundai Vision G Concept Coupe

Power comes from the 5.0-liter Tau V8 engine that features in the Genesis Coupe. Producing 420 hp (313 kW) and 519 Nm (383 ft lb) of torque, the engine in the Vision G has been upgraded with an enhanced timing chain, low-torque exhaust manifold, an increased compression ratio and upgrades to the injection mapping to give it a flatter torque curve than the motor in the Genesis.

The Vision G Concept Coupe debuted to journalists at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) this week and will now make its way to the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance, which kicks off on August 16.

Source: Hyundai

11 comments
OwenFuchs
hyundai is still a piece of junk in my opinion, they have extremely low resale value.you can dress them up all you want,but you still have a inferior automobile compared to the german and Japanese and American brands.....
Solomookie
Perhaps you haven't checked out Hyundai in a while. I've always been a Japanese car proponent, but my wife now has a '12 Elantra and I have a '13 Sonata Turbo. We have had no issues whatsoever. The fit and function of both cars equals any Honda or Toyota I have ever had. And the 270 HP makes my Turbo a blast to drive. We keep cars for so long that resale is not a consideration, but perhaps one of reasons Hyundais have low resale value (if they do) is because of attitudes like yours. We're perfectly happy with ours. As an aside, did you really just put the German cars in the quality category as the Japanese? What are you smoking? VW consistently rates as one of the least reliable brands on the road, and BMW & Mercedes are not much better.
phissith
Please take my money!!!
wanderkip
Nice design, with a well-proportioned beltline and roof tumble-home. Yes, Hyundai is a long way from a quality reputation, but maybe someone at Ford will see this and build a stretched Mustang sedan!
DmitryTkachuk
Gawd! Hyundai will never be a luxury car. Maybe in Korea. Luxury brands are mostly German, Italian and British. Everything else- daily junk.
dblevins
Except for the "seemly_the_design_THING" guppie-like grill, rather good-looking.
DmitryTkachuk
Just to make sure we're on the same page here: Are we talking your daily transport such as Sonata and Elantra or "LUXURY"? Cause your fancy "turbo" has nothing to do with luxury. VW btw translates into "car for ppl" - not the German I was referring to even with their "Luxury" Phaeton with 0 sales. I've yet to see a sane person with enough money to buy a Mercedes, who decides to save a buck and buys two "luxurious" Hyundais. Brands aren't judged by the quality of the build anymore, it' s a social status they provide.
klo2001
I started liking Hyundai a couple years back when their designs started to show a bit of sex appeal and now with this coupe I have to say this is one totally sexy luxurious looking beast. IMO this is the best looking car on the road today period. Volvo are also starting to get some sexy solid looking wagons coming out too and I'd rate them as my 2nd favourite before Bently, Audi, BMW an Mercedes.
Scion
Nice looking car, but as others have stated the physical thing doesn't make the brand. Call me culturalist (if that's a thing) but I've noticed amongst Singaporean and Hong Kongian drivers the notion that Mercedes is "the car to have" to the point that you could drive a rusty beat up old Merc and still be considered to have a classy car. So how does Hyundai plan to combat that sort of attitude? Design and quality might be a start but not an end. It's the same reason no one has bothered to mass produce a car that looks like a Ferrari but costs like a ... well ... Hyundai. No one would believe it.
P17
At last, an Asian car that doesn't look like it was made from a couple of old yoghurt pots and a sheet of PVC. It's managed to avoid the old Asian trick of listing everything the car has got on the bootlid too! The only thing that looks a bit tut is the steering wheel and the climate control. They look a bit cheap and nasty. However, the rest looks great. What a shame it's only a concept because it brings Asian cars up to the level of European cars in terms of design. Now, if only the Yanks can join in we won't all have our eyes assaulted on a daily basis by God awful looking cars on our roads! If it is built, it will struggle to compete with Mercedes and BMW. Look at Lexus, I was in one the other day and it was truly awful in comparison to a Merc. It still felt like a Toyota and wasn't at all special feeling. No-one with a brain is going to fork out £60k plus for a car from a manufacturer that gave us 1970s British Leyland Tech in the 1990s. Their best approach is to either sell it in the bargain basement where Hyundai as a brand belongs, or, completely divorce itself from Hyundai with a totally separate brand and get Europeans in to run it.