Electronics

Instamic is a tiny, self-contained audio recorder

Instamic is a tiny, self-conta...
The Instamic audio recorder measures 1.5 x 1 x 0.5 in (38 x 25.4 x 12.7 mm) and will attach to pretty much anything
The Instamic audio recorder measures 1.5 x 1 x 0.5 in (38 x 25.4 x 12.7 mm) and will attach to pretty much anything
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The Instamic audio recorder measures 1.5 x 1 x 0.5 in (38 x 25.4 x 12.7 mm) and will attach to pretty much anything
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The Instamic audio recorder measures 1.5 x 1 x 0.5 in (38 x 25.4 x 12.7 mm) and will attach to pretty much anything
The Instamic audio recorder can be controlled via an accompanying smartphone app
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The Instamic audio recorder can be controlled via an accompanying smartphone app
The Instamic is charged via USB, via which users can also transfer their recordings to a computer
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The Instamic is charged via USB, via which users can also transfer their recordings to a computer
The Instamic Go is designed to be splash-proof and the Instamic Pro is designed to be waterproof
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The Instamic Go is designed to be splash-proof and the Instamic Pro is designed to be waterproof

A new device is aiming to do for audio recording what the GoPro did for video recording. The Instamic is a small, self-contained, high-quality sound recorder. It is aimed at musicians, filmmakers, journalists, bloggers and other people who need a simple and effective means of capturing sound.

There are two versions of the Instamic: the Go and the Pro. Both offer mono and dual mono recording, with the Pro boasting stereo recording as well. The Pro is also waterpoof up to 5 ft (1.5 m) for a maximum three hours (in accordance with IP68), whereas the Go is only splash-proof. Other than those differences, the models are pretty much identical.

They each provide ultra-low power digital signal processing, with a sample rate of 48 kHz and a 24-bit bitrate. Their microphones capture between the frequencies of 50 and 18,000 Hz, with a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio of 67 dB and and maximum sound pressure level of 120 dB.

The device has 2 GB of built-in memory and allows for up to 4 hours of uncompressed audio recording. It is charged via USB and takes around two hours for a complete charge. The USB connectivity also allows users to transfer recordings to their computer.

The Instamic is charged via USB, via which users can also transfer their recordings to a computer
The Instamic is charged via USB, via which users can also transfer their recordings to a computer

Users can begin recording either by pressing a button on the device or via the accompanying mobile app (no word yet on about the platforms upon which the app will be available). The app also allows users to monitor and adjust the input signal level and alter the Instamic's settings. The Instamic connects to the accompanying app via Bluetooth 4.0, which gives it a wireless range of about 30 ft (10 m) from the smart device.

At 1.5 x 1 x 0.5 in (38 x 25.4 x 12.7 mm) the Instamic is pretty discreet and will reportedly attach to pretty much anything. It is provided with a variety of mounting options, including a magnet, velcro and adhesive tape.

An Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign is underway to raise funds for the Instamic. At the time of writing, backers will need to pledge at least US$99 for a single device. Assuming all goes to plan with the production and roll-out, shipping is expected to begin in Q1 2016.

The video below is the Indiegogo pitch for the Instamic.

Sources: Instamic, Indiegogo

INSTAMIC - The smartest mic on earth ready to record - Indiegogo Campaign

4 comments
oldguy
Yes, I can see that with one of these at the end of a very light boom pole, sound recording for video just got much simpler.
esar
I own an audio recorder that can record 10 hours in stereo and uses one AAA to do it. Looks just small enough to lose
ChrisLeavitt
Funny I find this today, browsing the new Gizmag posts (that is, new since I last went through), after searching Amazon for small lapel microphones that I could use with my GoPro for vlogging. This would be even better for my purposes, provided it has adequate noise cancellation. Velcro attachment would be superb for attaching to the inside of my motorcycle helmet, and separate audio/video feeds are certainly ideal for post-production!
windykites
I have recently lost a small audio recorder which looks like a USB memory stick. It has 4 GB of storage, and a regular USB plug. I think it costs around £25. This little gadget may well give a better sound, but having recently lost mine, this looks particularly vulnerable to going missing. I wouldn't stick it on the back of a car, for example. It certainly is not that cheap. Is crowdfunding just a way of selling a new product at a premium price?