Wearables

Intel fashions stress-sensing glasses and a belt-based projector

Intel fashions stress-sensing ...
Intel has teamed up with fashion designer Hussein Chalayan to create an outfit with a pair of stress-sensing glasses, and a belt that projects that data onto a wall
Intel has teamed up with fashion designer Hussein Chalayan to create an outfit with a pair of stress-sensing glasses, and a belt that projects that data onto a wall
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The images thrown up by Intel's smart glasses and belt change in real-time as the wearer's stress levels change
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The images thrown up by Intel's smart glasses and belt change in real-time as the wearer's stress levels change
Intel has teamed up with fashion designer Hussein Chalayan to create an outfit with a pair of stress-sensing glasses, and a belt that projects that data onto a wall
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Intel has teamed up with fashion designer Hussein Chalayan to create an outfit with a pair of stress-sensing glasses, and a belt that projects that data onto a wall
Intel's smart glasses monitor the brainwaves, heart rate and breathing to determine their stress levels, and then transmit that data via Bluetooth LE to a connected device
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Intel's smart glasses monitor the brainwaves, heart rate and breathing to determine their stress levels, and then transmit that data via Bluetooth LE to a connected device
Models at Paris Fashion Week demonstrate the outfit, with their moods projected up on the wall
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Models at Paris Fashion Week demonstrate the outfit, with their moods projected up on the wall
The high-tech outfit comes from the mind of fashion designer Hussein Chalayan
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The high-tech outfit comes from the mind of fashion designer Hussein Chalayan
The outfit, along with Intel's smart glasses and belt, looks to be straight out of an 80s sci-fi movie
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The outfit, along with Intel's smart glasses and belt, looks to be straight out of an 80s sci-fi movie
Intel's smart belt processes the data from the glasses, visualizes it and with a built-in Pico projector, throws it onto a wall for all to see
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Intel's smart belt processes the data from the glasses, visualizes it and with a built-in Pico projector, throws it onto a wall for all to see
The glasses run on Intel's Curie module, a tiny brain designed to power wearable electronic devices
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The glasses run on Intel's Curie module, a tiny brain designed to power wearable electronic devices
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From 3D-printed high-heels to Wi-Fi jackets, and watches packed with enough smarts to make James Bond jealous, fashion and technology are – for better or worse – increasingly intertwined. For Paris Fashion Week, designer Hussein Chalayan has teamed up with Intel to create a high-tech outfit straight out of an 80s sci-fi movie, complete with glasses that sense stress and a belt that projects live images of that data onto a wall.

The glasses are running on Intel's Curie, a button-sized module designed as a low-power, versatile "brain" for wearable devices such as Chromat's dress and sports bra, which surfaced at last year's MADE Fashion Week. In this case, the smart specs determine the wearer's stress levels by monitoring biometric data such as brainwave activity via in-built EEG electrodes. There's also an optical heart rate sensor and a microphone that picks up breathing rate.

With Curie's built-in Bluetooth LE, that data is sent to a connected device like a smartphone or, in this case, a belt. Rather than watch your waistline like the Welt, this one uses an Intel Compute Stick to process that information and present it visually. An embedded pico projector then throws that live interpretation of a wearer's stress levels up on a wall for all to see, which sounds like a fairly stressful situation in itself. By focusing on calming themselves down, the wearer is supposed to be able to change that imagery in real-time.

Models at Paris Fashion Week demonstrate the outfit, with their moods projected up on the wall
Models at Paris Fashion Week demonstrate the outfit, with their moods projected up on the wall

Why? We're not sure, but that's seems to be a common response when you're talking about the world's bleeding-edge fashion runways – with or without an extra dollop of technology.

After Paris Fashion Week wraps up, the collection will be on display from November at the "Fear andLove: Reactions to a Complex World" exhibition at the Design Museum in London.

Source: Intel [1], [2] (PDF)

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1 comment
JamesWang
Is this an early April Fools joke? A reverse fanny pack stuffed with a huge projector. I feel bad for the models:(