Wearables

Kipstr will start recording the TV show you're watching when you fall asleep

Kipstr will start recording th...
The Kipstr is a wristband that will start recording a TV show being watched should the wearer fall asleep
The Kipstr is a wristband that will start recording a TV show being watched should the wearer fall asleep
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The Kipstr is a wristband that will start recording a TV show being watched should the wearer fall asleep
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The Kipstr is a wristband that will start recording a TV show being watched should the wearer fall asleep
Kipstr inventors Ryan Oliver and Jonathan Kingsley
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Kipstr inventors Ryan Oliver and Jonathan Kingsley

If you've ever sat down to watch a program on TV only to wake up as the closing credits are rolling, there's a new wearable device in which you may be interested. Kipstr makes sure you don't miss your show by dozing off. The wristband recognizes if you fall asleep, and starts recording.

Kipstr was created by Manchester Creative Studio students Ryan Oliver and Jonathan Kingsley, who are 15 and 14 years old respectively. The UK-based pair were taking part in Virgin Media's Switched on Futures scheme aimed at developing digital skills.

The device uses a pulse-oximeter to monitor the wearer's heart rate while they are watching TV. When its spark core chip detects that the wearer's heart rate has fallen, it communicates with their TiVo box to begin recording the remainder of the program that is being watched. The Kipstr can also be used to trigger the program to start playing again when it detects that the wearer has woken up.

Kipstr inventors Ryan Oliver and Jonathan Kingsley
Kipstr inventors Ryan Oliver and Jonathan Kingsley

The device is powered by a small lithium-polymer battery. The strap itself is 3D-printed in Polyjet resin using an Objet Connex 3D Printer. According to Virgin Media, Polyjet was used as it is more robust than the "rigid plastics used by most 3D printers."

Virgin Media suggests that the Kipstr could also be used for monitoring the emotional responses of users to different TV programs, tagging the programs appropriately for future reference. Similarly, it could be used to control other devices in the home when the wearer falls asleep, such as turning off lights or the heating to save money.

Virgin Media says it will be trialing the Kipstr this Christmas.

Source: Virgin Media

5 comments
Alex Karp
Useful...20 years ago.
gseattle
Is Kipstr reliable enough to begin powering down a sleepy driver's vehicle with alarm.
cattleherder
That could be a poster boy for a "breakthrough solution for first-world problems".
Mark Salamon
An indispensable device for extreme couch potatoes. For the rest of humanity, this may not be quite so crucial...
Keenan Lee
So what happens when I fall asleep watching the parts I fell asleep to in the first place? I'd be watching re-runs of re-runs.