Outdoors

This barbecue fits on your bike

This barbecue fits on your bik...
The Knister Grill can be mounted on any type of bars, using a non-permanent bracket
The Knister Grill can be mounted on any type of bars, using a non-permanent bracket
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The Knister Grill was created by Munich-based entrepreneur Carolin Kunert
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The Knister Grill was created by Munich-based entrepreneur Carolin Kunert
The two sliding halves of the Knister Grill's body can be pulled apart from one another, doubling its length
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The two sliding halves of the Knister Grill's body can be pulled apart from one another, doubling its length
The Knister Grill can be mounted on any type of bars, using a non-permanent bracket
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The Knister Grill can be mounted on any type of bars, using a non-permanent bracket
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It's nice to be able to cycle to a picnic in the park, but what happens if you want to take your barbecue with you? Well, you could try towing a full-size model behind your bike, or you could just get the compact (but extendible) handlebar-mounted Knister Grill.

Created by Munich-based entrepreneur Carolin Kunert, the Knister attaches to any type of bars using a non-permanent size-adjustable steel bracket. The grill only stays on the bike while in transit, carrying the coals, food and utensils within it.

Upon reaching the park, the user pulls the grill off its mount, and totes it basket-style by its steel carrying handles. Once it's time to start cooking, those handles fold down to become its legs. Depending on how much food is being prepared, the Knister can then be used in its present state, or the two sliding halves of its body can be pulled apart from one another, doubling its length.

The two sliding halves of the Knister Grill's body can be pulled apart from one another, doubling its length
The two sliding halves of the Knister Grill's body can be pulled apart from one another, doubling its length

After the coals have been lit and are glowing nicely, food is placed on one or both of the included stainless steel grill racks. The main rack has two "zones" – one with wide slots for things like steaks, and one with narrower slots for smaller items such as veggies.

Once the picnic is over and the spent coals are disposed of, the Knister reportedly takes only about four minutes to cool to a transport-safe temperature. The interlocking stacked grill racks (which are dishwasher-safe) then keep any residual coal dust from blowing into the user's face as they're riding home.

If you're interested, the Knister is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign. A pledge of €99 (about US$117) will get you one, when and if they reach production. The estimated retail price is €179 ($211). There's also a non-extendible model, available for a pledge of €69 ($81) – retail €139 ($164).

You can see the Knister Grill in use, in the following video.

Sources: Knister Grill, Kickstarter

KNISTER GRILL - Transport your BBQ by bike

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2 comments
Malatrope
Uh, this is also called a hibachi, and it's been around for over fifteen hundred years. We used them in the spaces between the dorms when I went to university in 1970. They were sold in places like K-Mart and they were excessively cheap and easy to use.
I really wish people would stop re-inventing the wheel and trying to make money off people with no memories or experience.
ljaques
What? You heathens are still using charcoal, the absolute worst way to cook, environmentally speaking? Why isn't this propane? So, how do you expect people out in a park, in a field, etc. to get rid of live coals? What about the massive danger of charcoal sparks from gusts of wind? This is just irresponsible, folks. I have a $25 portable propane grill from Wally World which has folding legs just like this $211 job. It cannot blow sparks, cools down more quickly, and there are no coals to dispose of. Besides being 400 times less environmentally spewy.