Bicycles

LeafxPro is like an umbrella for your bike

LeafxPro is like an umbrella f...
The LeafxPro aims to keep cyclists dry in a downpour
The LeafxPro aims to keep cyclists dry in a downpour
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You'll need to shell out £99 (US$153), plus shipping, to hopefully receive the basic Classic unit and a carry bag
1/5
You'll need to shell out £99 (US$153), plus shipping, to hopefully receive the basic Classic unit and a carry bag
LeafxPro claims its design is aerodynamic to the point that riding in winds of up to 80 km/h (50 mph) will cause no issues
2/5
LeafxPro claims its design is aerodynamic to the point that riding in winds of up to 80 km/h (50 mph) will cause no issues
The LeafxPro comes in a few different models, with Classic being the base model, and Advanced, Storm, Family, and Pro all offering slightly different takes on the design
3/5
The LeafxPro comes in a few different models, with Classic being the base model, and Advanced, Storm, Family, and Pro all offering slightly different takes on the design
The LeafxPro aims to keep cyclists dry in a downpour
4/5
The LeafxPro aims to keep cyclists dry in a downpour
Weight comes in at somewhere around 1 - 1.3 kg (2 - 3 pounds), depending on model
5/5
Weight comes in at somewhere around 1 - 1.3 kg (2 - 3 pounds), depending on model

Even the most dedicated bicycle commuter could be forgiven for taking a look at the weather outside every now and then, and deciding to drive the car to work instead. LeafxPro aims to cater for such occasions with what's most easily described as an umbrella for your bike.

LeafxPro comes in various shapes and sizes, with Classic being the base model, and Advanced, Storm, Family, and Pro all offering slightly different takes on the design, and different levels of protection from the weather. The designers state that it will attach to any type of bicycle in around a minute, though there's no mention on exactly how it attaches to the bike at this point, possibly because work on refining it is ongoing.

The open design of the Classic model doesn't really look like it could keep you dry in a heavy downpour, though Storm seems to offer more shelter. Weight comes in at somewhere around 1 - 1.3 kg (2 - 3 lb), depending on the model, and none prevent cyclists from looking around or make turn signals. Height is adjustable and there are a number of colors available.

The LeafxPro comes in a few different models, with Classic being the base model, and Advanced, Storm, Family, and Pro all offering slightly different takes on the design
The LeafxPro comes in a few different models, with Classic being the base model, and Advanced, Storm, Family, and Pro all offering slightly different takes on the design

Though the basic idea of riding around in a weather-protecting bubble has cropped up before in systems like Dryve and Veltop, it hasn't really taken off up to this point. Perhaps a key reason for this is wind. One can easily imagine being buffeted dangerously across the road in a crosswind after attaching such a thing to a bike. However, LeafxPro reckons it's got this covered, and claims its design is aerodynamic to the point that winds of up to 80 km/h (50 mph) will cause no issues.

If you're willing to take the gamble that the designers have got this right, you can help try and move LeafxPro forward from the prototype stage to production by backing its Kickstarter campaign. You'll need to shell out £99 (US$153) for the basic Classic unit and a carry bag. If all goes well, delivery is estimated for September 2015 and additional models are available at higher pledge levels.

The video below shows the LeafxPro in use.

Sources: LeafxPro, Kickstarter

LEAFXPRO - Umbrella (leaf) for your Bike

13 comments
Rehab
Maybe rain gear and goggles would be less affected by cross winds? Anything that promotes cycling I am all for if it's practical and safe.
Freyr Gunnar
A solution looking for a problem: A good rain cape is a simpler, cheaper, and more protective solution: http://cycleking.co.uk/uploaded/thumbs/thumb3_BC750.jpg Combined with gaiters and good rain shoes, I've ridden whole days in the rain while still perfectly dry underneath.
Techtwit
Could be fun with a good strong tail wind (and good brakes) but really hard work in a head wind. Beinteresting to find out how much visibility the rider has after riding on wet city roads for a while. Car windscreens can get very dirty, but have screen washer/wiper systems, and bikers have sponges for ther visors.
Jay Finke
This is hilarious, A sail for a bike, that looks like it attaches to the rider ? Thats going to make for a nice body slam, that will rival something you would see in Pro Wrestling. good news is you can now text without getting your phone wet too. This bike umbrella idea might work better if the seat is removed.
Tom Benson
And when the wind catches this umbrella it throws you in front of a car, your dead. No thanks.
Madlyb
So...you will just be soaked from the waist down?
sk8dad
Will this actually keep the rider dry? ...or would rider still need to wear raingear? If latter then why bother?
Martin Hone
This hair-brained idea came up many years ago for motorcycles. Didn't work then either....
Bob
"...aerodynamic to the point that winds of up to 80 km/h (50 mph) will cause no issues." I don't think so. 20 mph maybe. Besides, having half your body soaked isn't much different than being all wet.
Germano Pecoraro
In past decades Piaggio, Peogeut, etc produced accessories like. For bicycles is a different matter: there is the problem delvento front and side; the rain side. This solution then holds up the gusts of wind? And 'much better to have adherent capes. I would have built a smaller windshield It is a sail!