Automotive

Lotus lightens the load with Evora Sport 410

The Lotus Evora Sport 410 is a lighter, faster limited edition version of the Evora Sport 400
The Lotus Evora Sport 410 is a lighter, faster limited edition version of the Evora Sport 400
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The Evora Sport 410 has a carbon fiber tailgate with integrated rear spoiler and louvered backlight
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The Evora Sport 410 has a carbon fiber tailgate with integrated rear spoiler and louvered backlight
Ultra light-weight, 10-spoke forged aluminium wheels come standard the on the Evora Sport 410
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Ultra light-weight, 10-spoke forged aluminium wheels come standard the on the Evora Sport 410
The carbon fiber front splitter on the Evora Sport 410
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The carbon fiber front splitter on the Evora Sport 410
A Spartan-like interior features race-inspired sports seats, but no armrests
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A Spartan-like interior features race-inspired sports seats, but no armrests
The Lotus Evora Sport 410 is a lighter, faster limited edition version of the Evora Sport 400
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The Lotus Evora Sport 410 is a lighter, faster limited edition version of the Evora Sport 400
More carbon fiber parts on the Evora Sport 410
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More carbon fiber parts on the Evora Sport 410
The Lotus Evora Sport 410 is a lighter, faster limited edition version of the Evora Sport 400
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The Lotus Evora Sport 410 is a lighter, faster limited edition version of the Evora Sport 400

For a company known for being obsessed with making its cars as light and fast as possible, Lotus has gotten downright stingy with the recent introduction of the Lotus Evora Sport 410. The result is an even lighter and slightly faster version of its Evora Sport 400 introduced last year.

Let's start with the weight. Lotus claims to have eliminated 70 kg (154 lbs) from the 410's predecessor, bringing the total unladen weight down to 1,325 kg (2921 lbs). Chalk it up to a generous use of carbon fiber in exterior parts like the front splitter, roof panel and tailgate, and in the race-inspired sports seats and front access panel on the interior.

Powering the lighter weight 410 is a higher output version of the company's Nürburgring record-breaking 3.5 liter 6-cylinder engine. The result is a slight uptick in horsepower from 400 hp (298 kW) to 410 hp (306 kW), but no change in the 410 Nm (302 lb ft) of torque also found in the Evora 400.

The Evora Sport 410 has a carbon fiber tailgate with integrated rear spoiler and louvered backlight
The Evora Sport 410 has a carbon fiber tailgate with integrated rear spoiler and louvered backlight

Top speed between the two models is still listed at 186 mph (299 km/h), but you'll hit 0-60 mph (96.5 km/h) quicker – 3.9 seconds in the 410 versus 4.1 seconds for the Evora 400.

Lotus also lowered the 410's center of gravity by 5 mm, which when combined with the lower weight and some recalibration of the suspension and improved damping, should result in even better handling.

While the standard 6-speed manual transmission remains unchanged between the two models, Lotus has incorporated its Dynamic Performance Management (DPM) system in the 410, offering Drive, Sport and Race settings via a dashboard switch. Depending on the chosen setting, the driver experiences changes in throttle response, traction and understeer.

A Spartan-like interior features race-inspired sports seats, but no armrests
A Spartan-like interior features race-inspired sports seats, but no armrests

Staying with the weight loss theme, the Spartan-like interior evident in the Evora 400 is just as prevalent in the 410. There are no armrests, and air conditioning, a sound system and cruise control are all optional.

Lotus is only making 150 of the Evora Sport 410s, and delivery in all major markets other than North America is set for June 2016. A North American version is expected to be announced later this year.

If lightweight and speedy is your thing, you might want to get your order in now. Keep in mind, the one thing Lotus didn't reduce in the 410 is the price. At £79,900 (US$111,600) the Lotus 410 is £7,000 (US$9,800) more than its predecessor. Lotus enthusiasts will have to judge for themselves whether or not that difference is worth the price of exclusivity.

Source: Lotus

2 comments
Keith Reeder
"obsessed with making its cars as light and fast as possible" Lotus has NEVER been obsessed with being as fast as possible - in fact it has always been a criticism of Lotus that their cars are never QUITE as fast as they could/should be. This latest Evora is a perfect example: other companies can and do get 500+ bhp/200+ mph out of 3.5 (OK - 3.8) litres, but Lotus haven't gone there. There's no doubting they COULD (they'd only need to add a turbo along with the supercharger), but they've CHOSEN not to. Lightness and handling were - and are - always Lotus' priorities.
Captain Danger
This car weighs 2900 lbs and it is supposed to be light, and compared to todays cars it is. What I fail to see is why cars are so heavy in the first place. I just looked up the specs on a 65 mustang and it was listed at 2600 lbs. And it is a 4 seater. I also looked up a 1968 lotus elan and it came in at 1850 lbs, and I am sure there is no carbon fibre used on it. Does government regulation add 1000 lbs to a car?