Bicycles

Loud Bicycle Horn is ... well, it's LOUD

Loud Bicycle Horn is ... well,...
The Loud Bicycle Horn (seen above and below the middle of the bars) is anything but subtle
The Loud Bicycle Horn (seen above and below the middle of the bars) is anything but subtle
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The Loud Bicycle Horn is water-resistant, is attached using theft-resistant security bolts, and should provide about two months of "average" use per charge of its battery
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The Loud Bicycle Horn is water-resistant, is attached using theft-resistant security bolts, and should provide about two months of "average" use per charge of its battery
The Loud Bicycle Horn (seen above and below the middle of the bars) is anything but subtle
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The Loud Bicycle Horn (seen above and below the middle of the bars) is anything but subtle
The Loud Bicycle Horn tips the scales at 1.5 lb
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The Loud Bicycle Horn tips the scales at 1.5 lb

One of the big reasons people give for not commuting by bicycle is the fear that drivers won't notice them on the road. While various devices are available to make bikes and riders more visible, the designers of the 125-decibel Loud Bicycle Horn have concentrated their efforts on another goal – making sure that cyclists are heard.

The Loud Bicycle Horn mounts on the top tube, down tube, stem or handlebar, and is activated via a hard-wired bar-mounted thumb button. It's water-resistant, is attached using theft-resistant security bolts, and should provide about two months of "average" use per charge of its battery.

It's also big – as can be seen – and tips the scales at 1.5 lb (0.7 kg).

The Loud Bicycle Horn is water-resistant, is attached using theft-resistant security bolts, and should provide about two months of "average" use per charge of its battery
The Loud Bicycle Horn is water-resistant, is attached using theft-resistant security bolts, and should provide about two months of "average" use per charge of its battery

Another fact worth noting is that it actually combines two horn sounds, one high and one low. According to its manufacturers, this makes it sound more like a car horn, which drivers will react to more readily.

The result of a successful Kickstarter campaign, the Loud Bicycle Horn can be heard in the video below, and is available now for US$102 – but if you get it, please use it sparingly. While we're at it, we should also mention the UK-made Hornit bicycle horn. It puts out 140 dB, and is priced at £29.99 (about $47).

... and if you want to outdo both the Loud Bicycle Horn and the Hornit, you could always try tracking down the one-off scuba-tank-powered 178-dB Hornster.

Source: Loud Bicycle Horn

Introducing the Loud Bicycle Horn

12 comments
Brady
I like the concept of making it sound like a car horn. They are right that people will react better to a sound they understand. The price is too high and it's too big though.
Freyr Gunnar
> One of the big reasons people give for not commuting by bicycle is the fear that drivers won't notice them on the road. They don't need this in the Netherlands and Denmark. They don't need helmets and high-visibility jackets, either. Why? "Cycling in the US from a Dutch perspective" www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2THe_10dYs
owlbeyou
I ride my bicycle more than my car. "See and be seen" is a crucial approach for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians. It blows me away how some people go about their travel. From carefree to distraction and even aggressiveness. In the city you get all kinds. If you're going to share the road with cars, your eyes have to constantly be on the move. Car as well as bike riders can be obnoxious. Blasting a horn for little reason is very annoying. If I'm going to use my bike for any extended time on the street, I use a sports whistle, and even then sparingly or not at all. If you really want to be heard, a sports horn/blaster is cheaper (20 bucks), louder, lighter and even more obnoxious. Yup. See and be seen comes first. Hear and be heard comes next. And keep your cool!
Oun Kwon
Can you provide a different sound - how about a nostalgic 'Aooga; Aooga'? Wish most cars have that instead of irritating HONK HONK.
Jay Finke
Drive that bike on the sidewalk where it belongs, if bicycle want to use my road, they need to start paying taxes, should be around $175.00 US a year per a bike
David Earnest
I use a ball peen hammer to gain the attention of brain dead, nose picking drivers. And a rather loud VOICE. Amazing how brave some of these people are until they get out of the car to scream and yell and then suddenly realize they are completely WRONG. I used to ride my bike to my job as a cab driver. You'd be amazed at the entitlement mentality of both drivers and riders. Share the road people. BTW the horn above is completely unnecessary.
Milton
I'm an aggressive bike-rider, I haul-ass, abide by road signs, and take up the full-lane in slow (25 MPH) roads. But even taking up the full lane, I've been cut-off 3 times by cars in the 10 times I've gone road cycling. (I'm usually on the trails). I came from motorcycles... so I know the importance of a good horn. Any motorcyclist that insists on reeving their engine over laying on the horn is a fool. Just like any cyclist who insist on yelling instead of laying on a horn is a fool. (granted, a horn isn't typically an option on a bicycle, so I've done my fair share of yelling). That being said, I added this product to my cart immediately after seeing the video.
Jorel
@Jay Finke, in every area of the U.S. that I'm aware of, adults are actually required to ride in the street (and in fact specifically PROHIBITED from the sidewalk), in the same direction as the flow of other vehicular traffic, and to obey all other regulations as well. "Share the road" isn't just a slogan, it's the law. Since many drivers (such as you) remain unaware of that, and even if aware are less than exemplary at applying it, a good horn is a good idea. All that being said, 1.5 pounds and $50 seems ridiculous when as Oun Kwon noted, a sports horn is perfectly suited to the task...
DomainRider
Reminds me of that Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers cartoon where they sample the sound of an atomic bomb for their VW Beetle car horn...
Jay Finke
@Jorel They ride in packs, or flat out think they own the road .when there are sidewalks 10ft across for them to ride on, in lots of areas. It's only a matter of time before one or two get run over by a texter. I'm sure getting run over by a car can't ever happen especially when it comes up from behind you, that gives you plenty of time to react, before getting crushed to death ( rolled up like a joint ) The total cost of bicyclist injury and death is over $4 billion per year. bicyclist injuries between 2001 and 2011: 8.9 percent. So maybe a licence or a IQ test should be implemented for all bicyclist.