Marine

Swiss smart yacht points solar-hydrogen power toward "limitless" range

Swiss smart yacht points solar...
The Aquon One makes its own hydrogen using solar-powered electrolysis
The Aquon One makes its own hydrogen using solar-powered electrolysis
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The Aquon One has been in development for several years and listed for purchase in November
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The Aquon One has been in development for several years and listed for purchase in November
The Aquon One houses a large terrace on its flybridge, complete with lounge, outdoor cooking station and bar
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The Aquon One houses a large terrace on its flybridge, complete with lounge, outdoor cooking station and bar
The living room on the main deck features plenty of large windows
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The living room on the main deck features plenty of large windows
Main deck living and dining rooms
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Main deck living and dining rooms
At thee head of the dining table
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At thee head of the dining table
The bedrooms are all located on the lower deck
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The bedrooms are all located on the lower deck
The Aquon One is billed as the world's first solar-hydrogen yacht
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The Aquon One is billed as the world's first solar-hydrogen yacht
The Aquon One has batteries for short-term usage and carbon hydrogen tanks for long-term energy storage
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The Aquon One has batteries for short-term usage and carbon hydrogen tanks for long-term energy storage
The Aquon One makes its own hydrogen using solar-powered electrolysis
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The Aquon One makes its own hydrogen using solar-powered electrolysis
The Aquon One is driven with a hydrogen fuel cell-powered electric motor in each hull
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The Aquon One is driven with a hydrogen fuel cell-powered electric motor in each hull
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Combining two forms of sustainable energy into one range-extending propulsion system, Swiss Sustainable Yachts' clean, quiet catamaran promises to jumpstart a future in which the word "range" becomes obsolete. The 64-footer harnesses solar energy to create its own hydrogen, powering a fuel cell-electric drive to potentially limitless autonomy, so long as the sun is shining and the captain isn't pushing past cruising speed. The Aquon One might prove the ultimate luxury smart yacht of the sustainable generation.

The Aquon One has a 134-hp fuel cell-powered electric engine in each hull. Swiss Sustainable Yachts (SSY) explains that it opts for hydrogen power because of its light weight as compared to batteries or fossil fuels, long-lasting storage capability and lack of harmful emissions. Also critical to the Aquon One design is hydrogen's ability to be created sustainably, in this case using a solar-powered electrolyzer that splits hydrogen from desalinated seawater. The 689 square feet (64 sq m) of solar panels covering the Aquon One's hard-top generate all the electricity needed to develop the hydrogen, which is then stored away in carbon tanks.

The Aquon One does include a small battery bank for short-term energy needs, both for propulsion and onboard electrical usage. The hydrogen, on the other hand, is compressed and designated for longer-term use. SSY claims the hydrogen tanks hold more than 100 times the energy of a full-size modern battery system, offering more range and capability than it would get by expanding the size of its battery.

The Aquon One is billed as the world's first solar-hydrogen yacht
The Aquon One is billed as the world's first solar-hydrogen yacht

The idea of relying on sunlight to create electricity, to power hydrogen conversion, to again create electricity for propulsion sounds rather inefficient on its face, and we have doubts as to whether the Aquon One will be able to produce hydrogen as effectively as billed or obtain anything near "limitless" range. That range claim already comes with a big asterisk denoting that "limitless" is only applicable with plenty of sun and the vessel ducking below the 8-knot (15 km/h) cruising speed to stay within 4- to 6-knot (7.4 to 11 km/h) speeds. So even if range is theoretically boundless, it's going to take a while to putter from point A to B – not necessarily a bad thing when aboard a breezy, luxurious 64-foot (19.5 m) catamaran, but still possibly a slower-going trip than desired.

The proposition of an oceangoing yacht that uses readily available solar power to self-sufficiently create its own fuel supply is certainly an attractive one, though. It would be especially useful on an expedition-class yacht meant to explore remote parts of the world, though the Aquon One system clearly isn't advertising unlimited autonomy for that type of usage. The Aquon One is billed more as a short-haul 10-passenger "pocket yacht," and it seems best-suited for the likes of island-hopping, weekend trips and other short excursions.

The Aquon One has been in development for several years and listed for purchase in November
The Aquon One has been in development for several years and listed for purchase in November

Solar-hydrogen power isn't the only sustainable component of the Aquon One design. A water recycling system separates gray and black water, purifies and gives the water second life. The construction process relies on sustainable methods and materials, including bamboo. An electric tender ensures that shorter trips are as quiet and emissions-free as the primary vessel.

On board, the Aquon One lives like a smart home of the sea, its 2,691 square feet (250 sq m) of living space tied together by smart energy management, state-of-the-art communications, and a connected appliance suite that includes the fridge, washing machine, dryer, dishwasher and more. Mobile device control makes it easy to increase ventilation, lower or raise window shades, or adjust lighting.

Main deck living and dining rooms
Main deck living and dining rooms

The Aquon One layout starts up high with the wide-open flybridge below the solarized hardtop, hosting an open-air social space with full U-shaped lounge, outdoor kitchen with grill, and bar. The main deck is where passengers will enjoy indoor social spaces, including a living room with large glass windows and its own terrace, a dining area and the main kitchen. The lower deck houses the master and guest bedrooms, bathrooms and crew quarters.

Swiss Sustainable Yachts has been showcasing the Aquon One design at events throughout 2021 and last month partnered exclusively with marine brokerage Fraser Yachts, which lists it at a cool €6 million (approx. US$6.8 million). Latvian shipyard Latitude Yachts will handle construction, and the first deliveries are planned for 2023.

The quick video below provides a closer look at the Aquon One's energy supply.

AQUON One green hydrogen energy system explained

Source: Swiss Sustainable Yachts AG

View gallery - 10 images
9 comments
9 comments
paul314
Sailboats also have unlimited range.
martinwinlow
This is abject stupidity.

Using *100%* pure water (essential for the hydrolysis process) results in worse than 70% ‘round-trip’ efficiency (converting water to H2 and then back to electricity in a fuel cell), let alone sea water - which would seriously reduce that figure even more. A big battery in a boat like this is no issue - it might even be an advantage by adding stability. Quite why they have chosen not to use one and go with a fuel cell instead suggests the makers have no clue whatsoever what they are doing (just like H2 for road transport advocates the world over).

I feel another Nikola-esque scandal coming on!
guzmanchinky
I love the idea, but what I'm really waiting for is a big powerful yacht that runs on fusion. Limitless power and a/c! I know, it'll be a while...
Sergo Kalandadze
So...is hydrogen is safe to store in large quantities? A small leak, mixed with air will lead to a big explosion. Goodbye cool 6M, its wealthy owners, pitifully - possible bystanders, and ecology of course.
Knut
I salute @martinwinlow, but it is much easier to make hydrogen from seawater than oil, and it is oil the refineries and oil people try to use to make "green hydrogen".
Silent Yacht is making battery-based yachts, and they have around 400KWh of batteries. With this size of the boat, 20m x15m, there are solar panels for more than 50KW max or around 240KWh per day. With the usage of 10KW trust, it will run forever at around 6 knots.
Using fuel cells with an efficiency of less than 40% is the biggest waste of energy. They could have used a Wankel motor from Rothor that doubles as a generator for electricity. Using hydrogen is backed by the oil companies, and they have no patents in the Wankel motor. It exemplifies the disaster brought on by lies and greed.
Knut
The main issue is that these boats are most of the time in port. The solar panels generate electricity every day, also when the batteries are full.
Very few boats are used anywhere near what the solar panels generate: 200KWh per day or 1MW from Monday to Friday. Then have a blast during the weekend, this one using up to 134KW x 2 or 5-6 hours on max speed, 120 - 150nm. That is a spin from Monaco to Spain or from Jacksonville to Bermuda at a speed of more than 25 knots. That is not pleasant in this boat, clinging cutlery, 4 times the speed of a sailing yacht. They have a valid point that you can generate an infinite amount of hydrogen, a huge amount while in port, where boats are most of the time. When the batteries are full, they cannot take more. 1MW is a battery of around 2 tonnes, and merchants ships use bigger batteries. Then the boat can be designed to go faster, 50 knots but they have different hulls because, at high speeds, the water is hard. Thanks @C.C.Weiss
joe46
this seem to be a convoluted, inefficient way to run the electric motors, not to mention storing large amounts of explosive hydrogen ! just run the motors off batteries and use the solar panels to keep them topped up, that'll extend the range. sounds like they just want to jump on the "green hydrogen" band wagon.
Demosthenes
The solar roof is just the green fig leaf of a luxury yacht weighing tons, like a few solar cells on an SUV. Ridiculous.
ljaques
I wonder if saline sea water (nope, it's not acidic yet.) corrodes the electrolyzer enough to warrant the desalination of the water first. Why isn't the oxygen also compressed and kept? It'd be great to clear the heads of the partying crowd which will be onboard. Is this a $3M yacht with a $500k solar/electrolysis system being sold for just a _bit_ more?