Automotive

Mercedes first to equip production cars with CO2 air-con

Mercedes first to equip produc...
An S-Class with Mercedes' CO2-based air conditioning system is tested in the aeroacoustic wind tunnel in Sindelfingen, Germany
An S-Class with Mercedes' CO2-based air conditioning system is tested in the aeroacoustic wind tunnel in Sindelfingen, Germany
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An S-Class with Mercedes' CO2-based air conditioning system is tested in the aeroacoustic wind tunnel in Sindelfingen, Germany
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An S-Class with Mercedes' CO2-based air conditioning system is tested in the aeroacoustic wind tunnel in Sindelfingen, Germany
CO2 air conditioning systems operate at a pressure ten times higher than today's typical R134a refrigerant systems
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CO2 air conditioning systems operate at a pressure ten times higher than today's typical R134a refrigerant systems

Mercedes says it is will be the first carmaker to equip production models with CO2 air conditioning systems. CO2 systems are said to perform better than conventional systems and to be more environmentally friendly. The move is in response to an EU directive that comes into effect in 2017.

Mercedes has tested the new technology on all of its vehicle models and, based on the results, designed its system in such a way as to separate the refrigerant/air mixture from the hot engine components in the event of a collision. This is to minimize the risk of fire.

CO2 systems operate at a pressure ten times higher than today's typical R134a refrigerant systems, at more than 100 bar. As such, the new systems require designs and components that can handle the increased pressure safely.

The upcoming legislation is based on the EU's climate protection requirements and Mercedes has been involved in drafting the standards for the use of the new technology. It says the standards will help other carmakers to begin development of their own systems quickly.

The German automaker claims to be the first to both award development contracts and place production orders for CO2 air-con systems and their components. the European S- and E-Class models will be the first Mercedes cars equipped with the new technology.

Source: Mercedes

5 comments
Bill Bennett
1470.00 psi, impressive, yeah working on German cars for over 40 years.
MQ
I'm sure there will be positives from a carbon-economy.
Though if it is such a great Idea, why did the EU (effectively) have to mandate a move to Environmentally less damaging products than the Tetrafluoro-hydrocarbons currently used.
The 100bar pressure must need some additional engineering when compared to the ~2-3bar (low pressure side) of current systems.
But, generating your own refrigerant must be a great buzz.
Procyon
You are confusing systems/refrigerants!

Daimler's first production-ready car using R1234yf as refrigerant caught fire in a test in autumn of 2012. When R1234yf is burning, it releases highly corrosive and toxic gases. This was the reason why Daimler started developing CO2 air-conditioning systems.

When using CO2, there is no need to separate the refrigerant from hot engine components in the case of a collision because CO2 is non-flammable.

Sources:
http://www.heise.de/autos/artikel/Update-Mercedes-Kuenftig-CO2-oder-R1234yf-in-Klimaanlagen-2850905.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene
Martin Hone
I was going to say, why not use the CO2 to help douse an engine fire after an accident. It could be set up so that it is released once the airbags are deployed.
Animemaster
"Mercedes has been involved in drafting the standards for the use of the new technology."
So they create a new technology that will increase the cost of cars, they weasel there way onto a drafting board to require every car maker to adopt it and sell there license there patented tech. Consumers loose. Tell me, how is this a good idea.