Bicycles

In pictures: The 2016 North American Handmade Bicycle Show

In pictures: The 2016 North Am...
This stunning stem from Bellon Handmade Bicycle was just one of the treasures on display at NAHBS 2016
This stunning stem from Bellon Handmade Bicycle was just one of the treasures on display at NAHBS 2016
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Demon Frameworks got this look by plating a steel frame in nickel, then rubbing antiquing fluid on it
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Demon Frameworks got this look by plating a steel frame in nickel, then rubbing antiquing fluid on it
A reproduction 1888 full-suspension Whippet bike, made by Paul Brodie
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A reproduction 1888 full-suspension Whippet bike, made by Paul Brodie
The Whippet's front suspension
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The Whippet's front suspension
Part of the Whippet's rear suspension
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Part of the Whippet's rear suspension
The Whippet's rear spoon-style brake can be seen here
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The Whippet's rear spoon-style brake can be seen here
Interesting shock-absorbing feature of the seat stays of this bike by Sarto
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Interesting shock-absorbing feature of the seat stays of this bike by Sarto
This bike from Sarto features a unique "painting" process – the frame was coated in chrome, then the colors were applied to the chrome using ink
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This bike from Sarto features a unique "painting" process – the frame was coated in chrome, then the colors were applied to the chrome using ink
An upright titanium drop-bar tricycle, from Ti Cycles
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An upright titanium drop-bar tricycle, from Ti Cycles
A one-of-a-kind ski bike, from Koski
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A one-of-a-kind ski bike, from Koski
Boo Cycles' bamboo stand-up paddleboard
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Boo Cycles' bamboo stand-up paddleboard
A fatbike-specific Lauf Carbonara leaf-style suspension fork
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A fatbike-specific Lauf Carbonara leaf-style suspension fork
Calfee Design's Car Killer bamboo e-bike
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Calfee Design's Car Killer bamboo e-bike
Rob English created this one-off tribute to the record-setting track racing bike famously used by Graeme Obree, aka The Flying Scotsman
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Rob English created this one-off tribute to the record-setting track racing bike famously used by Graeme Obree, aka The Flying Scotsman
Tight rear wheel clearance and a big carbon chainring
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Tight rear wheel clearance and a big carbon chainring
Bread Winner Cycles had this custom bike rack for motorcycles on display – note that the bike and motorcycle have matching paint jobs
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Bread Winner Cycles had this custom bike rack for motorcycles on display – note that the bike and motorcycle have matching paint jobs
TºRed is currently running a Kickstarter campaign to finance production of the Manaia, which features a frame made from scandium-zirconium reinforced aluminum/magnesium alloy
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TºRed is currently running a Kickstarter campaign to finance production of the Manaia, which features a frame made from scandium-zirconium reinforced aluminum/magnesium alloy
The personal bike of an employee from Radsport USA – note the brake cable routed down through the front fork
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The personal bike of an employee from Radsport USA – note the brake cable routed down through the front fork
A heavy-duty hauler from Peacock Groove
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A heavy-duty hauler from Peacock Groove
A design study from Tsubasa Bicycles
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A design study from Tsubasa Bicycles
Side-by-side riders share steering and pedalling duty, on this Pineapple Trike
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Side-by-side riders share steering and pedalling duty, on this Pineapple Trike
An experiment from WH Bradford Designs – using a rear shock to suspend a front fork
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An experiment from WH Bradford Designs – using a rear shock to suspend a front fork
A striking e-bike from Maxwell Cycles, minus its midship-mounted motor
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A striking e-bike from Maxwell Cycles, minus its midship-mounted motor
This experimental Lifebike uses a unique frame design to transfer pedalling torque across from the drivetrain side of the bike, lessening frame flex
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This experimental Lifebike uses a unique frame design to transfer pedalling torque across from the drivetrain side of the bike, lessening frame flex
A 3D-printed titanium lug on Bastion Cycles' new road bike
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A 3D-printed titanium lug on Bastion Cycles' new road bike
A fatbike from Reeb Cycles was sporting these monstrous 5.05-inch tires from Vee Tire – fatbike tires have typically topped out at 4.8 inches in width
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A fatbike from Reeb Cycles was sporting these monstrous 5.05-inch tires from Vee Tire – fatbike tires have typically topped out at 4.8 inches in width
A swooping "cargo bay" on this bike built by Frances
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A swooping "cargo bay" on this bike built by Frances
King Cage had this titanium flask on display
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King Cage had this titanium flask on display
A 36-inch-wheeled DirtySixer
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A 36-inch-wheeled DirtySixer
Nice splattery paint job by Biwakoguma Bicycles
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Nice splattery paint job by Biwakoguma Bicycles
Unusual raised chain stays, courtesy Journey Bicycles
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Unusual raised chain stays, courtesy Journey Bicycles
Another 36er, this time a one-off from Black Sheep Bikes
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Another 36er, this time a one-off from Black Sheep Bikes
An eye-catching Shamrock Cycles cycle
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An eye-catching Shamrock Cycles cycle
Beautiful lugs and anodizing process on the stem, from recently-departed builder Brian Baylis
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Beautiful lugs and anodizing process on the stem, from recently-departed builder Brian Baylis
Some of the gold accents on this creation from Formigli
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Some of the gold accents on this creation from Formigli
Note how the top and bottom of the seat tube on this Dekerf don't line up – this was in order to maintain the desired overall design of the bike
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Note how the top and bottom of the seat tube on this Dekerf don't line up – this was in order to maintain the desired overall design of the bike
A wider look at the Dekerf bike
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A wider look at the Dekerf bike
A snazzy cowhide frame bag
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A snazzy cowhide frame bag
An early DIY recumbent, as ridden in 1976 by Doug White of components manufacturer White Industries
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An early DIY recumbent, as ridden in 1976 by Doug White of components manufacturer White Industries
What has to be one of the world's smallest titanium bikes, from Russia's Triton Bikes
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What has to be one of the world's smallest titanium bikes, from Russia's Triton Bikes
Just to do it, Rob English created this "one-sided" mountain bike
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Just to do it, Rob English created this "one-sided" mountain bike
It has a one-legged fork, and just a single chain stay
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It has a one-legged fork, and just a single chain stay
A tandem fatbike from Santana
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A tandem fatbike from Santana
There were several "woodies" on hand, such as this one from Connor Wood Bicycles
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There were several "woodies" on hand, such as this one from Connor Wood Bicycles
A very fun-looking titanium urban/track bike, made by Dean
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A very fun-looking titanium urban/track bike, made by Dean
Gorgeous paint jobs on this Ritchey ...
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Gorgeous paint jobs on this Ritchey ...
... and on this TripleThreeFab bike
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... and on this TripleThreeFab bike
A 3D-printed titanium bottom bracket lug, on a bike made by Metier Velo
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A 3D-printed titanium bottom bracket lug, on a bike made by Metier Velo
Gloss and gold, from McGovern Cycles
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Gloss and gold, from McGovern Cycles
This stunning stem from Bellon Handmade Bicycle was just one of the treasures on display at NAHBS 2016
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This stunning stem from Bellon Handmade Bicycle was just one of the treasures on display at NAHBS 2016
Here's a titanium slingshot from Caletti Cycles – marbles are stored in its handle, and it'll cost you US$250
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Here's a titanium slingshot from Caletti Cycles – marbles are stored in its handle, and it'll cost you US$250
View gallery - 50 images

If you're looking for unique, exquisite bikes from around the world, then the North American Handmade Bicycle Show is the place you should be. This is the third year we've attended, and once again it didn't disappoint. Read on to see some of our faves from the trade show floor.

This year's show took place in Sacramento, California, over the last weekend of February.

Throughout the past few days, we've already featured some of the bikes that really caught our eye for one reason or another. For a quick recap of those, along with a whole bunch of others, just pay a visit to our photo gallery.

Show website: NAHBS

View gallery - 50 images
2 comments
Bob Stuart
I would put any of them in an art show, but none in a book on technical efficiency, or into use on the road.
LakeeshaGobeatcha
While on assignment in North Yorkshire, England in '74/'75, I took a trip to Southend-on-Sea and visited the bike shop of Alf Hetchins. His father and he were famous for making bike frames as fancy as any on earth, and they specialized in "curly" rear stays. They used hand-cut Belgian lugs as I remember. I ordered a frame in fire engine red with a white head tube. I specified the tubing type and sizing and all other specs and told Alf that the bike was to be for serious touring use.
I came back in four months to pick it up, and it was GORGEOUS! Cost me about $225 back then, a nice deal since a finished Hetchins bike for sale at a specialty shop in the USA typically went for up to $3,000 at the time (a LOT of money back then!). I had a pal with a bike shop in Santa Cruz hand-build the wheels and finish the bike for me using all the best Italian parts and Phil Wood sealed hubs and crank bearings. And I had Spence Wolf of the Cupertino Bike Shop fix up a superb Brooks Pro leather saddle for me ... he oiled it, baked it, and pounded it until it was SOFT! It eventually molded to my rear end and is still the best saddle I ever sat on.
The finished bike's total cost was about $1,200, and it was the prettiest thing you ever saw. I used it in the BikeCentennial tour across America in 1976 and rode it an average of 70 miles per day for 82 days (less a day off every 10 days), for a total of 5,000 miles (once I hit the east coast, I kept riding north for awhile). It was so comfortable and so stable you could ride it all day with no hands, even loaded with 45 pounds of panniers. I never dropped the bike and even took it into stores and restrooms with me.
Ten years later I had it on the roof of my car as I drove to a grocery store for medicine for the flu. I was so messed up that I drove right into the underground garage with a concrete ceiling. The bike was crushed to death, and I immediately burst into tears. I was a 45yo man, but that bike was my most precious possession, and it died a terrible death right there in my arms. I now have a hitch rack (the only way to go), some photos, and my memories of that wonderful, incredible bike.