Urban Transport

Nand Logic's Smart Helmet features cameras, turn signals, collision alerts and more

The Smart Helmet's aerodynamic design is intended to lessen wind noise
The Smart Helmet's aerodynamic design is intended to lessen wind noise
View 3 Images
The Smart Helmet's aerodynamic design is intended to lessen wind noise
1/3
The Smart Helmet's aerodynamic design is intended to lessen wind noise
The helmet includes built-in turn indicators and a brake light
2/3
The helmet includes built-in turn indicators and a brake light
When the temperature and humidity sensors notice that things are getting too warm and moist inside the helmet, an onboard fan is automatically turned on to provide ventilation
3/3
When the temperature and humidity sensors notice that things are getting too warm and moist inside the helmet, an onboard fan is automatically turned on to provide ventilation

Nand Logic's Smart Helmet may just top the list when it comes to the highest number of electronic goodies packed into a single helmet. While it's intended for activities such as motorbiking, cycling or snowboarding, some people might end up wanting to wear the thing even when they're just walking down the street – or auditioning to join Daft Punk.

Currently in prototype form, the Smart Helmet's various electronics are run by an onboard multicore SoC (system on a chip). Also helping out are an integrated accelerometer, gyroscope, ambient light sensor, Bluetooth module and GPS module, plus temperature and humidity sensors.

Like the Forcite Alpine ski helmet, it features a forward-facing HD video camera for recording first-person footage on an onboard SD card. There's also a rear-facing camera, the footage from which can be recorded for purposes such as insurance claims – unlike the case with the Reevu helmet, that second camera is not used for a real-time rear view system.

Utilizing an object-tracking algorithm, however, the two cameras can be used to keep an eye on other traffic around the user. If that software determines that a collision is imminent, it will sound an alert via the helmet's stereo speakers – a visual warning system utilizing LEDs in the user's peripheral vision is also planned for the finished product.

The helmet includes built-in turn indicators and a brake light
The helmet includes built-in turn indicators and a brake light

Using the GPS, accelerometer and gyroscope, the helmet is able to ascertain its position within three-dimensional space. This allows it to activate built-in turn signals and a brake light, when the user is turning to either side or slowing down. Additionally, the ambient light sensor determines when it's getting dark outside, to let the helmet know it's time to turn on its built-in LED headlights.

When the temperature and humidity sensors notice that things are getting too warm and moist inside the helmet, an onboard fan is automatically turned on to provide ventilation (and yes, it is also possible for the wearer to manually flip up the visor).

Additionally, to keep things from getting too noisy in there, an external mic monitors ambient sounds, and can then use the helmet's sound system to cancel out distracting audio such as wind or engine noise. At the same time, however, it can detect sounds such as sirens or car horns, and alert the user to them.

When the temperature and humidity sensors notice that things are getting too warm and moist inside the helmet, an onboard fan is automatically turned on to provide ventilation
When the temperature and humidity sensors notice that things are getting too warm and moist inside the helmet, an onboard fan is automatically turned on to provide ventilation

Not surprisingly, the Smart Helmet can also communicate with the user's smartphone via Bluetooth. This allows users to do things like making and receiving calls, receiving turn-by-turn directions, or listening to music (which they really shouldn't be doing while in traffic).

Nand Logic had the prototype on display at CES, and plans on raising production funds via a Kickstarter campaign this summer (Northern Hemipshere). The company tells us that although it's challenging, the target price for the helmet is under US$500.

Source: Nand Logic

5 comments
Bam Bear
Please, share this article with Skully, they have my 1399 in preorder money and still cannot get a forward facing camera in the package and this helmet is 900 bucks less. Perhaps I should of waited.
Donald Baxter
can someone please care to look at the issue of cooking the brain with all those gizmos? you have not discussed the brain safety at all?!
Nand Logic
Donald, thanks for posting! I'm not too sure what you are referring to, when you say "cooking the brain." If you are indeed literally referring to the amount of "heat" energy generated by the electronics. I can say this, there are three layers of insulating and protective materials between the head of the wearer and the electronics. The first is a carbon composite, followed by a thick layer of foam and finally an additional layer of padding. The heat generated from the electronics and the LEDs is minimal at best, not even as hot as your average smartphone. In addition to this is added benefit of our "Active Ventilation" system (see article above) . Also the internal electronics will have a VCS (Virtual Control System) that monitors power consumption, and regulates the use of power on an application by application basis. Power consumption relates directly to heat, so this is yet another way we are addressing this issue. Now if you were referring to radiation energy, or dielectric heating consider this. All the devices we are deploying in our Smart Helmet can be found in any modern day smartphone. You are far more likely to receive radiation poisoning from excessive smartphone usage than our Smart Helmet, and as far as we aware of there have been no IARC validated reports of radiation poisoning or dielectric heating from excessive smartphone usage. Thanks for posting your comment! I hope this response helps a bit.
Kyle Gunn
Cool that Nand Logic jumped right into the post here. A whole lot of gadgets and with the mention of power consumption. I'm just curious if this is going to be re-chargable, and what one could expect for battery life expectancy? If I'm making a 2 hour ride, will I need to charge it before making the home trip?
bbflamingo
o.k. but is this helmet actually going to be D.O.T. approved? I mean cameras in both directions and all that are cool for sure, but, ummmm what about your head? Gotta have one intact to take maximum advantage of quality sounds.