Automotive

Nissan Serena will be the first Japanese vehicle with autonomous drive

Nissan Serena will be the firs...
Nissan is the first Japanese automaker to get an autonomous driving system to market
Nissan is the first Japanese automaker to get an autonomous driving system to market
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The different pieces making up ProPILOT
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The different pieces making up ProPILOT
The system is meant to be used on single lane highways, but will be aware of its surroundings on multi-lane highways by 2018. 
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The system is meant to be used on single lane highways, but will be aware of its surroundings on multi-lane highways by 2018. 
A look at how the Nissan ProPILOT system sees the road ahead
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A look at how the Nissan ProPILOT system sees the road ahead
The system uses a mono camera to see the road ahead
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The system uses a mono camera to see the road ahead
How to turn the system on and off
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How to turn the system on and off
Nissan is the first Japanese automaker to get an autonomous driving system to market
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Nissan is the first Japanese automaker to get an autonomous driving system to market

You'd be hard pressed to find an auto manufacturer that isn't working day and night on autonomous driving technology. The latest to announce a big step forward is Nissan, which will be the first Japanese manufacturer to hit the market with an autonomous driving system to control steering, brakes and throttle on the highway.

Having previously put Japan's Prime Minister in an autonomous Leaf and teamed up with NASA to develop autonomous technology, Nissan is bringing it's ProPILOT system to consumers in the fifth-generation Serena minivan to be released at the end of August. Although the Serena is a Japan-only model, Nissan also plans to introduce ProPilot on the 2017 Qashqai in Europe.

Designed for single-lane highway driving, the system uses information gathered from a mono camera to recognize lane markings and other vehicles in three-dimensions. Taking into account the speed preset by the driver, the system will maintain a safe distance behind the preceding vehicle while steering to keep the vehicle's position in the center of the lane.

It will also brake with the car in front and come to a complete stop if necessary. When the traffic moves on, pressing a button on the steering wheel or tapping the throttle turns it back on and the car takes control again.

Although the system is currently only intended for use in the single lane of a highway, Nissan says autonomous lane-change technology should arrive in 2018, and the company wants to have its cars autonomously tackling urban streets and intersections by 2020.

Source: Nissan

4 comments
Mel Tisdale
Have they decided who will be to blame when these things crash? What a pity that Google set this particular hare running.
habakak
Yeah, let's bottle the Genie. Good luck Mel. Humans crash too. It's on a case by case basis. Basically humans will try to blame it on the machines until human control is completely taken away (look at the recent cases involving Tesla cars and allegations by the owners of 'autopilot' being active at the time). But mostly the crashes will be caused by humans abusing the tech or using it not as they should. Like people dropping their phones in the toilet and expecting it to work when wet (most phones are not water proof). Remember, 40000 people die on US roads already every year mostly due to human error. This won't make roads or cars any saver but in the future it will be saver. The big miss with this tech currently is trying to follow lane markings. It's a big flaw. The car should determine the width of the road, check the amount of lanes assigned to the road according to record/law, check for medians, etc. and then drive in a virtual lane that should match the lane markings even if it's not present. Lane markings for instance disappear under snow.
bobflint
What they really should work on is an idiot proof car, that won't even open up to let an impaired driver into it, if your already inside, & start drinking , getting high ,or any other distraction set-up by the command module. Of course speed limits and turn signals would also be always in complete law abiding operational mode, as well as the ability to shut down safety by the side of the road and summon help as required when the system or partial operator fails. Keep in mind those same imperfect humans create and produce the elusive perfect autonomous vehicle...
Catweazle
I can just imagine it. System Application Error in Module Steering at &H3C47:23CA. Please Contact Your System Administrator.