Good Thinking

Non-toxic solution is claimed to make wood fire-resistant

If it works as claimed, AFA could help prevent house fires
If it works as claimed, AFA could help prevent house fires
View 1 Image
If it works as claimed, AFA could help prevent house fires
1/1
If it works as claimed, AFA could help prevent house fires

It was just this Wednesday that we heard about a non-toxic flame-retardant solution created by scientists at Texas A and M University. Well, researchers at Switzerland's Empa institute have also come up with one, which could be used to keep wood and wood-based building materials from burning.

Developed in partnership with Swiss company Bruag Fire Protection, the colorless liquid is known as AFA (Anti-Flame Additive). Effective in concentrations as low as 10 percent, it can be added to water-based paint or protective UV-resistant coatings which are then applied to wood, or it can be mixed into panels made from pressed wood fibers.

Its active chemical ingredient is an organophosphonate consisting of parts of phosphorus and nitrogen molecules, which have been combined into a single molecule. The additive reportedly doesn't produce toxic vapors, nor does it incorporate toxic flame-retardant substances such as bromine, boron or halogenated organic compounds.

In lab tests, it has been shown to effectively keep the cellulose in wood from igniting. An official approval process is now underway, after which AFA may be available as a commercial product.

Source: Empa

3 comments
Fritz
The best way to preserve forests is to use the wood sustainable! For heating, cooling electricity, furniture, building material, ... So called natural reserves are the real mess and danger for forests.
noteugene
They should take this stuff and press it into the fibers of the wood similar to the way pressure treated wood is formulated. No matter, insurance companies wont give you a dime off your deductable using safer, fire retardant lumber. Watch.
highlandboy
#Fritz: I suggest you read the article. It is a flame retardant for cut timber. Nothing to do with forests (other than they are a source of the timber).
Thanks for reading our articles. Please consider subscribing to New Atlas Plus.
By doing so you will be supporting independent journalism, plus you will get the benefits of a faster, ad-free experience.