Drones

NTT Docomo gets spherical LED display off the ground

NTT Docomo gets spherical LED ...
NTT Docomo's spherical drone display forms an aerial display measuring 144 pixels high and 136 pixels in circumference
NTT Docomo's spherical drone display forms an aerial display measuring 144 pixels high and 136 pixels in circumference
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NTT Docomo's spherical drone display consists of a quadcopter contained within an external frame and rotating strips of LEDs
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NTT Docomo's spherical drone display consists of a quadcopter contained within an external frame and rotating strips of LEDs
The spherical drone display forms an aerial display measuring 144 pixels high and 136 pixels in circumference
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The spherical drone display forms an aerial display measuring 144 pixels high and 136 pixels in circumference
NTT Docomo's spherical drone display forms an aerial display measuring 144 pixels high and 136 pixels in circumference
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NTT Docomo's spherical drone display forms an aerial display measuring 144 pixels high and 136 pixels in circumference
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We've seen those propeller LED displays make their way from shop windows to bicycle wheels, but now Japan's mobile phone operator, NTT Docomo has utilized the technology in a vehicle of the aerial kind. The result is a what the company believes is the world's first flying spherical drone display.

Consisting of a quadcopter contained within a spherical frame measuring 88 cm (34.6 in) in diameter, the device produces images via a series of eight vertical curved strips of LEDs that rapidly rotate horizontally. As the strips rotate, the LEDs flash on and off to form a display measuring 144 pixels high and 136 pixels at the "equator" of the LED frame.

NTT Docomo's spherical drone display consists of a quadcopter contained within an external frame and rotating strips of LEDs
NTT Docomo's spherical drone display consists of a quadcopter contained within an external frame and rotating strips of LEDs

Docomo says the largely hollow structure enabled by the lightweight external frame and internal LED frame overcomes the problem of creating a drone-based spherical display that doesn't interfere with the airflow around the drone's propellers while allowing the illusion of a solid display.

With the entire unit weighing 3.4 kg (7.5 lb), Docomo says the drone is extremely maneuverable and could be used at indoor or outdoor concert venues as part of a performance or to deliver event information or advertising. To this end, the company plans to commercialize the device before March 2019.

If you're keen to get an earlier look, the spherical drone display will be showcased in a flight demonstration at NTT Ultra Future Museum 2017 during the Niconico Conference that starts in Chiba City, Japan, on Saturday April 29.

Source: NTT Docomo

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1 comment
Bob Flint
Why does it have to fly, imagine a grounded device with multiple rotating arms facing inward the size of a room or bigger. A virtual rotoscope sphere that your inside of....