Computers

Nvidia GTX 1070 Ti GPU balances price and power

Nvidia GTX 1070 Ti GPU balance...
Nvidia has unveiled the GTX 1070 Ti, a new GPU that aims to strike a balance between power and price
Nvidia has unveiled the GTX 1070 Ti, a new GPU that aims to strike a balance between power and price
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Nvidia has unveiled the GTX 1070 Ti, a new GPU that aims to strike a balance between power and price
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Nvidia has unveiled the GTX 1070 Ti, a new GPU that aims to strike a balance between power and price

With the holidays around the corner, the busiest time of year for major game releases is upon us – and that means it's probably upgrade season, if your gaming rig is starting to stutter. And right on time to grab the attention of those looking to spruce up their PCs without forking out for the top-shelf GPUs, Nvidia has unveiled the newest graphics card in the GeForce GTX 10 line. Meet the GTX 1070 Ti.

Built on the same Pascal architecture as its siblings, the GTX 1070 Ti is loaded with 2,432 cores and 8 GB of GDDR5 memory, which is running at 8 Gbps and gives the card a total bandwidth of 256 GB/s. For those who aren't satisfied with the standard power, Nvidia has also made sure the 1070 Ti is overclockable, with clock speeds able to be boosted by an extra 40 percent, up to 1,683 MHz.

On the scale of power and price, the GTX 1070 Ti slots in between the GTX 1070 and 1080 cards, making it the third most powerful GPU in Nvidia's arsenal (the GTX 1080 Ti still claims the top spot). With that much graphical grunt under the hood, the 1070 Ti is designed to churn through high-end games, including those powered by DirectX 12, those featuring high dynamic range (HDR) or those playable in VR.

The GeForce GTX 1070 Ti will be available November 2, for US$449.

Source: Nvidia

1 comment
1 comment
Daishi
Now is a decent time to build a PC. Long gone are the full tower beasts with 2x GPU's, huge power supplies, and nests of cables everywhere. Cable management is better in modern cases, DVD drives are no longer needed, things like network and audio are on board. We have gone from huge IDE ribbon cables and HDD's to smaller SATA cables on SSD to M.2 socket SSD's right on the motherboard. Todays fans are larger in diameter and actually quiet. Onboard graphics performance on many CPU's is now passable for 1080p gaming and cards like GTX 1070 and 1060 are efficient enough that many people have downgraded to 450w and 550w PSU's form the 750w beasts of the past. Lots of people still use mid towers and ATX motherboards but the size and extra PCI slots are unnecessary and there is a growing trend of people doing small Micro ATX and Mini ITX builds that are compact and powerful machines. Even AMD's RX 460 is probably better than what most people are using in older PC's. There is a decently active community at pcpartpicker and PC builds make good modern father/son projects.