Outdoors

GoSun cranks up the heat with large, powerful Sizzle solar oven

GoSun cranks up the heat with ...
The GoSun Sizzle uses parabolic reflectors to capture the Sun's energy
The GoSun Sizzle uses parabolic reflectors to capture the Sun's energy
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GoSun has slapped a US$800 price tag on its Sizzle solar-powered oven
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GoSun has slapped a US$800 price tag on its Sizzle solar-powered oven
The GoSun Sizzle uses parabolic reflectors to capture the Sun's energy
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The GoSun Sizzle uses parabolic reflectors to capture the Sun's energy
The GoSun Sizzle works like the company's GoSun Fusion, cooking its food inside a vacuum insulated tube
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The GoSun Sizzle works like the company's GoSun Fusion, cooking its food inside a vacuum insulated tube
With the larger, redesigned reflectors, the GoSun Sizzle is claimed to offer much quicker cooking times
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With the larger, redesigned reflectors, the GoSun Sizzle is claimed to offer much quicker cooking times
A side-on look at the GoSun Sizzle
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A side-on look at the GoSun Sizzle
The GoSun Sizzle, all packed up
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The GoSun Sizzle, all packed up
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For eight years or so, GoSun has been offering outdoor enthusiasts clean ways of cooking up their meals through a range of solar-powered stoves, grills and ovens. Its latest and greatest is billed as its fastest and most powerful yet, enabling it to reach fire-like temperatures, while creating no smoke or emissions.

Called the GoSun Sizzle, the company's new solar oven works on the same principle as its GoSun Fusion that was introduced in 2018. This involves a pair of large parabolic reflectors that collect the Sun's rays and concentrate the energy into an insulated vacuum tube, where the trapped heat cooks up the food inside.

With the larger, redesigned reflectors, the GoSun Sizzle is claimed to offer much quicker cooking times, with a power output of 325 W under full sunshine compared to the 225 W offered by the Fusion.

This can apparently enable a family of five to whip up a meal within 30 minutes. And when the Sun isn't shining, users can tap into a built-in heating element that can be hooked up to a 12-volt power source to bring the tube up to temperature, allowing it to be used under clouds and also at night.

The GoSun Sizzle works like the company's GoSun Fusion, cooking its food inside a vacuum insulated tube
The GoSun Sizzle works like the company's GoSun Fusion, cooking its food inside a vacuum insulated tube

All of this comes in a slightly larger package than the GoSun Fusion, with the GoSun Sizzle tipping the scales at 14 lb (6.3 kg) and measuring 25 x 24 x 16 in (63.5 x 60 x 40 cm). It is still designed with portability in mind, however, with the folding reflectors able to be packed down for storage and transport.

GoSun has slapped a US$800 price tag on its Sizzle solar-powered oven, which is quite a leap from the $430 asking price for the Fusion. You can check out the promo video below.

GoSun Sizzle: World's Fastest Solar Oven

Source: GoSun

View gallery - 6 images
3 comments
3 comments
BeholdersEye
I am sorry, it is not worth $800!!! That is absolutely ridiculous, should cost no more then the fusion! I own two fusions... Oh buy on black friday for better pricing...
solas
That's right: $800 is way over the top. Actually, all the units are too pricey. That doesn't even include a power source for @night, just a connection. So $800 for a thin sheet of metal, and stand, and: a tempered glass tube.
Ralf Biernacki
The acrylic stand is a poor engineering choice for several reasons. Unlike sheet metal, the material is expensive to shape---it must be machined and polished. It deforms and discolors under heat, and contact with hot objects is practically inevitable in this application. It is brittle, especially with perforations like that, and poorly suited for the wear and tear of a camping trip---unless this is meant solely for glamping, which it clearly is. And the oven packs awkwardly, and requires fiddly tools to disassemble---after which it still packs awkwardly. A much better choice would be lightweight sheet metal, perhaps aluminum if you want to get fancy, with folding wire legs. But all this doesn't really matter, as the makers have effectively priced themselves out of the market anyway; they will sell a dozen or so, either expensively cutting and assembling every specimen by hand, or farming out the actual manufacturing to Chinese sweatshops (and paying them), and then selling out of the garage. What is it about inventors that gives them such abysmally poor business sense? Simplify the design to the bone, manufacture cheaply at volume, sell as cheap as you can, advertise where you can reach your target demographic, bend over backwards to build up sales volume, sales breed more sales. Is that so hard to understand? Every kid selling lemonade knows all that.