Architecture

Concept shelter would pop-up in an emergency

Concept shelter would pop-up i...
The shelter offers some of the benefits of a tent, but sports a fiberglass roof and floor, and real doors
The shelter offers some of the benefits of a tent, but sports a fiberglass roof and floor, and real doors
View 5 Images
The shelter offers some of the benefits of a tent, but sports a fiberglass roof and floor, and real doors
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The shelter offers some of the benefits of a tent, but sports a fiberglass roof and floor, and real doors
The shelter is raised off the ground on stilts
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The shelter is raised off the ground on stilts
Designnobis reports that with a few tools, the shelter could be assembled in just an hour
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Designnobis reports that with a few tools, the shelter could be assembled in just an hour
"The compact disaster shelter is made of a fiber and a durable weather resistant textile which is quilted sewed and consists thermally insulated perlite in between," explains the firm
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"The compact disaster shelter is made of a fiber and a durable weather resistant textile which is quilted sewed and consists thermally insulated perlite in between," explains the firm
Up to 24 units could be delivered by a single semi-trailer truck, according to the firm
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Up to 24 units could be delivered by a single semi-trailer truck, according to the firm
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Turkish design practice Designnobis has produced an interesting concept for a pop-up shelter, dubbed Tentative, that features a fiberglass roof and floor, and tent-like weather-resistant fabric walls. Though still in the early stages of development and thus lacking in some hard details, the compact shelter shows promise thanks to its dramatically decreased size when in transportation.

Measuring 4 x 2 x 2.5 m (13 x 6.5 x 8 ft) when in use, Tentative's interior would sleep two adults and two children (though the renders only depict a single bunk bed). Besides a couple of plastic chairs there's not a whole lot else going on inside, and it's spartan even compared to similar shelters, like Ikea's Better Shelter for example.

Still, where it excels – or at least could potentially excel if it lives up to its promise – is in ease of transportation, which is arguably the major concern in emergency shelter design. Tentative's height is reduced from 2.5 m (8ft) to just 30 cm (1ft) when ready for transport, and this would enable up to 24 units to be delivered to a needed area by a single semi-trailer truck, according to Designnobis.

The shelter is raised off the ground on stilts
The shelter is raised off the ground on stilts

To fully expand Tentative from its transportation state, you would first open the fiberglass top, which serves as roof (the bottom is the floor). Then, you'd need to raise the aluminum framework and place the two doors correctly to aid stability. Tough fabric is then stretched between the roof and floor. Designnobis reports that with a few tools, the shelter could be assembled in just an hour (we've currently no information as to whether it's as easily dismantled too).

"The compact disaster shelter is made of a fiber and a durable weather resistant textile which is quilted sewed and consists thermally insulated perlite in between," explains the firm.

The shelter would be raised off the ground using small stilts, and an insulated floor would further help reduce heat loss. Natural light would come in via a small skylight and window.

Designnobis told Gizmag that it's aiming to produce a prototype of the design and is also working on a larger model too. More details on this larger model will be released later in the year, but it will feature a toilet and rainwater collection system on the roof. The firm also stated that it is seeking collaboration to commercialize the concepts.

Source Designnobis via Dezeen

View gallery - 5 images
3 comments
Tom Lee Mullins
that looks like a great idea.
I wonder if one could use that for concerts and camp grounds? Where one would want temporary shelter?
Stephen N Russell
need this worldwide, awesome, must deploy worldwide IE PR, Canada, No Africa, EU for events in those areas.
JeJe
The materials sound expensive - fiberglass, special fabric, aluminium frame. Why not use polycarbonate? Solid, lightweight, strong, insulating, fire resistant, see-through (where required), proven, fairly cheap.