Automotive

Salt water-powered Quant e-Sportlimousine gets European approval

Nunzio La Vecchia accepts the TÜV registration
Nunzio La Vecchia accepts the TÜV registration
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Nunzio La Vecchia accepts the TÜV registration
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Nunzio La Vecchia accepts the TÜV registration
Nunzio La Vecchia accepts the TÜV registration
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Nunzio La Vecchia accepts the TÜV registration
Nunzio La Vecchia accepts the TÜV registration
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Nunzio La Vecchia accepts the TÜV registration
A look inside the Quant e-Sportlimousine prototype at the Geneva Motor Show
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A look inside the Quant e-Sportlimousine prototype at the Geneva Motor Show
The car's illuminated interior represents the flow of energy at work in driving its motors
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The car's illuminated interior represents the flow of energy at work in driving its motors
NanoFlowcell says the car is capable of speeds up to 217.5 mph (350 km/h)
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NanoFlowcell says the car is capable of speeds up to 217.5 mph (350 km/h)
The NanoFlowcell Quant e-Sportlimousine at the 2014 Geneva show
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The NanoFlowcell Quant e-Sportlimousine at the 2014 Geneva show
The NanoFlowcell Quant e-Sportlimousine at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show
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The NanoFlowcell Quant e-Sportlimousine at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show
NanoFlowcell is working to ready the car for series production
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NanoFlowcell is working to ready the car for series production
The Quant e-Sportlimousine was one of the most interesting cars in Geneva, but is it viable?
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The Quant e-Sportlimousine was one of the most interesting cars in Geneva, but is it viable?
Should the Quant e-Sportlimousine make it to production, it will be a green supercar in the mold of the Porsche 918 Spyder
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Should the Quant e-Sportlimousine make it to production, it will be a green supercar in the mold of the Porsche 918 Spyder
With more than 900 hp via four motors, the e-Sportlimousine is a fierce, emissions-free sports car
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With more than 900 hp via four motors, the e-Sportlimousine is a fierce, emissions-free sports car
Just prior to the NanoFlowcell press conference, Geneva Motor Show 2014
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Just prior to the NanoFlowcell press conference, Geneva Motor Show 2014
Nunzio La Vecchia presents the e-Sportlimousine to the crowd of journalists
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Nunzio La Vecchia presents the e-Sportlimousine to the crowd of journalists
Nunzio La Vecchia poses with the Quant e-Sportlimousine
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Nunzio La Vecchia poses with the Quant e-Sportlimousine
NanoFlowcell takes the wraps off the car at Geneva
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NanoFlowcell takes the wraps off the car at Geneva

After making a debut at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show, the Quant e-Sportlimousine has received approval from Germany's TÜV Süd. The car, which uses an electrolyte flow cell power system, is now certified for use on German and European roads.

As I stood around waiting for NanoFlowcell's Geneva Motor Show press conference in March, my eyes bounced back and forth between the exotic curves of the concept car at center dais, the oddly punctuated letters of the make and model and the bubbling tanks of water that looked like they were ripped off the wall of an after-hours lounge. Then Nunzio La Vecchia sauntered out, wearing his best jet black pompadour, and made a bunch of bold claims about the 912-hp, gull-winged 2x2 and its bleeding-edge flow cell technology.

Nunzio La Vecchia presents the e-Sportlimousine to the crowd of journalists
Nunzio La Vecchia presents the e-Sportlimousine to the crowd of journalists

Everything about the scene suggested that it might very well have been the last we heard of the NanoFlowcell Quant e-Sportlimousine. Promises of a magic bullet of energy storage, made by a three-month-old company, packaged with outlandish numbers like 0-62 mph (100 km/h) in 2.8 seconds and a top speed of 236 mph (380 km/h), hinted, rather strongly, that this car's technology and performance would only exist on paper. Given that a similarly outlandish Quant car, centered in a similar black-walled booth, introduced by a very different Nunzio La Vecchia company, had vaporized years earlier, it seemed a responsible assumption that the e-Sportlimousine would do the same.

Just a few months after its debut, however, the car has resurfaced and taken a step forward. After an in-depth inspection of the car, the German TÜV Süd in Munich handed over the official registration plate this week. Now the company will be able to test the car on public roads in Germany and Europe as it prepares it for series production.

"We are delighted as pioneers to be able to present an automobile driven by flow cell technology on public roads, and one which achieves not only fantastic performance values but also zero emissions," said Le Vecchia, tossing out a slightly revised set of numbers, including "a projected top speed of over 350 km/h (217.5 mph), acceleration from 0-100 in 2.8 seconds, a torque of four times 2,900 Nm (2,139 lb-ft) and a range of more than 600 km (373 mi)."

The flow cell system powering the Quant e-Sportlimousine's four electric motors develops electricity from an electrochemical reaction created by two electrolyte solutions. This electricity is forwarded to super capacitors where its stored and distributed.

The NanoFlowcell Quant e-Sportlimousine at the 2014 Geneva show
The NanoFlowcell Quant e-Sportlimousine at the 2014 Geneva show

Beyond fancy supercars, NanoFlowcell sees its technology taking on a variety of applications. Presumably it will work its way down to more affordable cars, but its perceived potential reaches far beyond the road's edge.

"We've got major plans, and not just within the automobile industry," says NanoFlowcell AG Chairman of the Board Prof. Jens-Peter Ellermann. "The potential of the NanoFlowcell is much greater, especially in terms of domestic energy supplies as well as in maritime, rail and aviation technology. The NanoFlowcell offers a wide range of applications as a sustainable, low cost and environmentally-friendly source of energy."

We'll wait to see the Quant e-Sportlimousine live up to its billing before we get too excited about that future expansion.

Source: NanoFlowcell

22 comments
Daishi
Am I wrong to assume this probably uses something similar to an Aluminium–air battery that is essentially non-rechargeable?
Hovnimrsk Prdelac
It would be nice if Gizmag redaction did some facts checking before publishing articles promoting Nunzio La Vecchia. Although flowcells do exist, their performance is nowhere close to the claims described here. I recommend googling a bit about the guy. The discussion on this page provides plenty of links to past and present scams of Nunzio La Vecchia: http://www.teslamotorsclub.com/showthread.php/28239-NanoFlowcell-Quant/page3
Martin Hone
Amazing figures are quoted, but no technical explanation. And what is different between this and the Koenigsegg Quant featured back in March 2009 ?
The Skud
Sounds good - pull into the supermarket instead of the servo ... "A kilo of salt please, oh, and can I use that outside tap?" BUT - I can see the price of salt soaring as Big Govt spots the popularity, just like our supposedly cheap diesel soared in price.
salcen
if it were true,what good would it do if it were out of reach of 99.99% of new car buyers?
kalqlate
More details, this article: http://www.gizmag.com/900-hp-supercar-flow-battery/31091/.
VirtualGathis
I agree the big deal here is the flowcell. If it actually performs as claimed it would be at least 20 times as efficient as the next best competitor that I have seen. With an over powered 900hp machine like this, a range of 375 miles would need something like 200kwh. They claim to get that from a tank that can fit in a motor-vehicle. The best "salt-water battery" I've seen has nowhere even close to that density. So I will be eagerly watching to see if the rubber does indeed meet the road on these cells or if it is as Hovnimrsk Prdelac pointed out.
Captain Obvious
It's not "salt water powered" at all. But most of us knew that.
InventPeace
nickel metal hydride batteries are coming soon the pattent that the oil company Texaco bought and then suppressed the large format versions (LF) for last 15 years runs out at end of 2014. 1. Charges from 40%-80% in ONLY 15 min, 2. If operatedonly within the 40%-80% can last decades according to Toyota 3. Range over 120 miles with only 14 LF batteries as shown in EV1 4. Some news (owned by super rich oily persons) have already started anti NiMh "stories" saying they pollute landfills; not mentioning that Ni is so valuable that is recycled when finally they need it. 5. Ask why the frantic fear of this the only LF battery prevented from the market, surely the would be as afraid other batteries Unless this one really is that good. 6 Rav4 EV'S from 1998 are still onthe road with original NiMh batteries!
Stephen N Russell
Is this process cheaper then H2 fuel cell mode? Mass produce for use worldwide, awesome