Automotive

Renault breaks frontiers with new Alaskan pickup truck

Renault breaks frontiers with ...
Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
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The new Alaskan rides on 16- or 18-in alloy wheels
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The new Alaskan rides on 16- or 18-in alloy wheels
The Alaskan has a very Renault face
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The Alaskan has a very Renault face
Renault will offer both long and short beds
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Renault will offer both long and short beds
The Alaskan will be powered by several engine options between 160 and 190 hp
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The Alaskan will be powered by several engine options between 160 and 190 hp
Renault reveals its new Alaskan global pickup truck
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Renault reveals its new Alaskan global pickup truck
Up close with the Renault Alaskan
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Up close with the Renault Alaskan
Renault Alaskan
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Renault Alaskan
Renault Alaskan
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Renault Alaskan
The Alaskan can tow over 7,700 lb
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The Alaskan can tow over 7,700 lb
The taillights have been toned down from the Alaskan concept
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The taillights have been toned down from the Alaskan concept
Renault promises a tough, off-road-ready chassis and design
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Renault promises a tough, off-road-ready chassis and design
Renault introduces the Alaskan
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Renault introduces the Alaskan
The Renault Alaskan is ready for off-road work or play
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The Renault Alaskan is ready for off-road work or play
Renault plans the initial launch in Colombia
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Renault plans the initial launch in Colombia
A 7-in infotainment touchscreen will be offered in select markets
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A 7-in infotainment touchscreen will be offered in select markets
Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
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Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
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Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
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Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
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Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
The Alaskan follows the half-tonne Duster Oroch into the Renault pickup family
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The Alaskan follows the half-tonne Duster Oroch into the Renault pickup family
Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
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Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
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Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
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Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
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Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup

After showing the sleek Alaskan concept pickup last September, Renault has launched the production version. Renault's first global 1-tonne pickup truck loses the icy look and concept-only accessories of the concept version, but maintains the rugged-but-shapely build. The Alaskan will soon find its way to the global market, starting in South America.

It looks like the US will be left standing by as another one of its states is used to label a product that won't be offered there. Americans probably won't be quite as disappointed about the Alaskan as they are about the Volkswagen California, but we're sure a few wouldn't mind working and playing behind the wheel of the world's latest pickup.

The Alaskan borrows a fully boxed frame from Nissan, and its dimensions and body lines are very closely related to the NP300 Navara. The Alaskan wears a distinct Renault look up front, however, with its slightly winged chrome grille, chrome riser bar, unique headlamps with LED daytime running lamps, and swept-back hood design. The Alaskan concept's "LED Pure Vision" taillights were one of its most distinctive features, but (not so surprisingly) they've been swapped for a more traditional taillight design.

Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup
Renault reveals the production Alaskan pickup

Renault will offer the Alaskan in a number of body styles and sizes, including single-cab, double-cab and chassis cab, long and short beds, and wide and narrow bodies. The muscular wheel arches accommodate 16- or 18-in alloy wheels.

In terms of power, the Alaskan will feature a number of options, depending upon market, including 160-hp and 190-hp 2.3-liter twin-turbo diesel four-cylinders, 160- and 190-hp 2.5-liter diesel engines, and a 160-hp 2.5-liter petrol engine. There will also be 2WD and 4WD options and six-speed manual and seven-speed automatic transmissions.

Other standard and available equipment will include a new five-link rear suspension for the double-cab version, a bed-mounted 12V power supply, a rear-locking differential, an electronic limited slip differential, and driver assistance systems like Hill Start Assist and Hill Descent Control. Towing capacity lists in at 7,716 lb (3,500 kg).

A 7-in infotainment touchscreen will be offered in select markets
A 7-in infotainment touchscreen will be offered in select markets

A keyless system provides entry, and the interior will include equipment like a 7-in color navigation touchscreen, CD player, smartphone connectivity, and 360-degree camera system, depending upon market.

The Alaskan was developed in France, Japan and Latin America, and it will continue its global focus when launched. Rollout will start in Colombia and expand from there, with manufacturing to be performed at three sites: Cuernavaca, Mexico; Barcelona, Spain; and Cordoba, Argentina. Renault's Pro+ service will help commercial customers in identifying the right Alaskan or Alaskan conversion for their needs.

Source: Renault

7 comments
RangerJones
Pretty easy to see why they choose not to compete here in the USA.
Rotogizmag
Well, maybe in association with the Japanese the French could make a quality car. Had a Peugeot that was TOA (Trash On Arrival).
flyerfly
I live in central Alaska and have not seen any of these tested here where many other vehicle makers test their creations for cold weather compatibility. I wonder if has ever been in Alaska for testing? Would it survive if it were actually used in Alaska? Also a 1 ton truck that can only pull 7000+ lb? That is rather poor. My 3/4 ton truck can and does pull considerably more. Perhaps it is for those who want a truck vs. those who NEED a truck.
ljaques
She has a face only a blind trucker could love, but the interior is kinda cool. That hood seems to be a nice shape to attract snow. I'll bet it hasn't been tested outside a garage in Alaska or other very snowy place. What will pricing be, I wonder? What is the bed-mounted 12v system for? It looks like a lighter midsize truck (Colorado, Tacoma), so that would limit the towing capability, but I've never towed more than 2 tons behind my Tundra, or 1.5 tons in the bed (gravel, topsoil), so it wouldn't affect people like me. My '07 Tundra will last me another decade or two, so I'm not that curious.
Calson
Incorrectly labeled a 1-ton pickup when it is obviously a mini-truck with the typical 1/2 ton payload. It will be interesting to see how they integrate the typical snorkel rig on this truck. Envy the people in Central and South America and Australia who have much better true off road trucks available to buy.
tennantrodney
So very disappointing - what happened to the cool design of the concept vehicle? This one looks almost like a Ford Ranger - not bad looking, but certainly not the game changer great looks of the concept. Vanilla. Seems like a company run by accountants - can't take the design risk needed to stand out.
premoto
So they basically took a Nissan and rebadged it like Honda did with the Isuzu Rodeo and then say "Hey, look everyone at what we did". Kind of embarrassing to me.