Bicycles

Riide e-bike weighs 35 pounds and is priced under $2,000

Riide e-bike weighs 35 pounds ...
The Riide electric bicycle
The Riide electric bicycle
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The Riide electric bicycle
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The Riide electric bicycle
The Riide weighs 35 lb (16 kg), and has a planned price of $1,799
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The Riide weighs 35 lb (16 kg), and has a planned price of $1,799
Company co-founder Jeff Stefanis with his creation
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Company co-founder Jeff Stefanis with his creation
Riders can simply pedal the bike with no assistance, they can go with the motor only, or they can go faster by both pedaling and using the motor
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Riders can simply pedal the bike with no assistance, they can go with the motor only, or they can go faster by both pedaling and using the motor
The Riide features mechanical disc brakes
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The Riide features mechanical disc brakes
A full charge of the battery takes two to three hours from a regular outlet
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A full charge of the battery takes two to three hours from a regular outlet
The motor is controlled via a bar-mounted throttle
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The motor is controlled via a bar-mounted throttle

One of the main advantages that e-bikes have over electric scooters is the fact that you can choose to propel them by human power only, reserving motor power for those times when you really need it. However, if that bike weighs 40 or 50 pounds or so (18 to 23 kg), then you probably won't want to "pedal only" it much. While some significantly lighter models do exist, their prices can range up to several thousand bucks. That's where the Riide e-bike comes in. It weighs 35 lb (16 kg), and has a planned price of US$1,799.

Developed by a Washington, DC-based start-up, the aluminum-framed Riide has a 36-volt 9Ah lithium-ion battery integrated into its down tube, delivering power to a 350-watt direct drive rear hub motor.

Riders can simply pedal the bike with no assistance; they can go with the motor only, to a top speed of 20 mph (32 km/h); or, they can go faster by both pedaling and using the motor. The bike has a motor-only range of 20 to 25 miles (32 to 40 km), with a full charge of the battery taking two to three hours from a regular outlet.

One thing that it doesn't have, however, is multiple gears. This is partly what keeps its cost and weight down, with the idea being that in situations where its one gear is too high for easy pedaling, its motor can be added to the mix to make up the difference.

The Riide weighs 35 lb (16 kg), and has a planned price of $1,799
The Riide weighs 35 lb (16 kg), and has a planned price of $1,799

Company co-founder Jeff Stefanis tells us that the inclusion of high-spec'd components is also a factor in its relatively low weight, while the fact that he plans to sell it direct to consumers (i.e: not through stores) additionally helps keep its cost down.

Jeff and co-founder Amber Watson are now raising production funds for the Riide on Kickstarter. A pledge of the earlier-mentioned $1,799 (but with shipping included in the US) will get you a bike of your own, when and if they're ready to go.

More information is available in the pitch video below.

Source: Kickstarter

8 comments
Gary Bonney
350w direct drive motor and single gear for pedalling will be totally useless any where there is a decent hill. So very limited market.
owlbeyou
You're right Gary. There is almost always a compromise when designers try to satisfy wide objectives, so the Riide machine can't make everybody 100% happy. 35 pounds is insanely light, and that limits it mostly to the city. But since most cities (not mine) are relatively flat, this may be a good choice for commuting and just getting around town. Perhaps a beefier model with more range is planned for later... My personal big concern is that conspicuous e-bikes are very sought-after by thieves, which makes it risky to park anywhere for any length of time. Integrated locking mechanisms and/or super bike locks would be absolutely necessary for one's peace of mind.
Larry English
the advantage of lightness to make it pedal-friendly, is negated by only having 1 gear, which makes it NOT pedal-friendly - at 35 lbs or any other weight if it only has one gear, it still isn;t really pedal-able, except where a heavy bike would also be pedal-able, so why go to the expense of making it light, without also adding some gears?
Walter Komarnicki
looks good
Michael Crumpton
The cost of a derailleur is insignificant in a $2k bike. That is just nuts.
Richard Guy
Strange to go for a hub drive for this product. 2013 8fun crank/mid-drive is inexpensive and will give much more ooomph. And you can combine it with gears more effectively.
Facebook User
Hi Everyone, Thanks so much for you interest and feedback in Riide, we really appreciate it! Just wanted to chime in on the single speed question! Over the past several months we've given hundreds of test riides all around DC (fairly hilly) and not once has there been an issue. The feedback has been extremely positive and riiders like the fact that it cuts down on maintenance. That said we'd like to put it up to the test! If you are in the DC area we'd love to have you take it for a riide and get your first hand review! Best, Jeff + Amber Co-founders of Riide
unklmurray
the only thing I don't like is the ''Only one gear"idea is good for flat grounders Butt ,I need more gears especially lower ones,you know where 1st gear has 20 teeth more than the smallest front chain ring!!