Robotics

Wall-climbing HB1 robot could find work in high places

Wall-climbing HB1 robot could ...
The HB1 utilizes dual fans to create a vacuum between its underside and the wall
The HB1 utilizes dual fans to create a vacuum between its underside and the wall
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Although operated mainly by remote control, the HB1 is able to determine where it is relative to the entire wall surface
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Although operated mainly by remote control, the HB1 is able to determine where it is relative to the entire wall surface
The HB1 being used to remove graffiti
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The HB1 being used to remove graffiti
The HB1 utilizes dual fans to create a vacuum between its underside and the wall
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The HB1 utilizes dual fans to create a vacuum between its underside and the wall
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It's safe to say that any task which involves going up high is at least somewhat dangerous. The HB1 robot was designed with this fact in mind, as it climbs walls and even scuttles across ceilings so people don't have to.

Currently about to enter the market, the HB1 was designed by British startup HausBots, which is a University of Warwick spinoff company.

The robot itself has four rubber-tire-clad wheels, and is connected to a ground-based remote control unit via a 110-volt electrical tether. It can be equipped with up to 6 kg (13 lb) of attachments which allow it to perform tasks such as spray-painting walls, or performing both visual and ultrasonic inspections of structures.

Although operated mainly by remote control, the HB1 is able to determine where it is relative to the entire wall surface
Although operated mainly by remote control, the HB1 is able to determine where it is relative to the entire wall surface

The HB1 clings to walls, pillars, ceilings or just about anything else using two integrated electric fans. These draw air from beneath the front and rear of the robot, expelling that air straight out the back of the bot to create downforce. This setup allows the device to move across flat or curved, rough or smooth surfaces, and to roll over small obstacles such as electrical conduits which may be present on those surfaces.

HausBots is currently inviting prospective buyers to register for updates via the company website. The robot is presently being offered in Europe (at an undisclosed price), and should be available to North American buyers in the first quarter of next year. You can see the HB1 in action, in the video below.

Learn More About the HB1 by HausBots

Sources: HausBots, University of Warwick

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2 comments
2 comments
Username
The higher it goes, the heavier its power cord gets. What is it's maximum operating height? (or, how long is 6kg of its cable. and that means no attachments.)
WB
notice how you hear no sound... its because this thing must sound like a jet engine taking off