Bicycles

Rubbee 2.0 is better at boosting bikes

Rubbee 2.0 is better at boosti...
The Rubbee 2.0 has a longer range and is "smarter" than the original model
The Rubbee 2.0 has a longer range and is "smarter" than the original model
View 6 Images
The Rubbee 2.0 has a longer range and is "smarter" than the original model
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The Rubbee 2.0 has a longer range and is "smarter" than the original model
A permanently-installed Pedal Assist Sensor monitors how fast the rider is pedaling
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A permanently-installed Pedal Assist Sensor monitors how fast the rider is pedaling
The Rubbee 2.0 is mounted on the bike's seatpost, allowing the motorized roller to be flipped down onto the tire only when needed
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The Rubbee 2.0 is mounted on the bike's seatpost, allowing the motorized roller to be flipped down onto the tire only when needed
It weighs 6.9 kg (15 lb)
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It weighs 6.9 kg (15 lb)
It has a range of 40 km (25 miles)
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It has a range of 40 km (25 miles)
The Rubbee 2.0 has a longer range and is "smarter" than the original model
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The Rubbee 2.0 has a longer range and is "smarter" than the original model
View gallery - 6 images

While there are plenty of add-on electric bicycle motors out there, the Rubbee takes a particularly interesting approach. The product of a successful Kickstarter campaign, it incorporates a powered polyurethane roller that rubs against the bike's rear tire (hence the name), helping to augment the rider's pedaling power by driving the wheel forward. The second version of the device is now available and it's reportedly easier to use, plus it'll take you farther.

Both versions of the Rubbee follow the same basic principle ... they're mounted on the bike's seatpost, allowing the motorized roller to be flipped down onto the tire only when needed. In fact, the whole Rubbee can be quickly installed or removed, via its quick-release mount. Power comes from an integrated 250-watt motor and a 14.4-volt 280-Wh battery pack, that can be fully charged from empty in three hours.

On the original version, the rider manually adjusts the motor’s output level via a handlebar-mounted controller that stays attached full-time. On the Rubbee 2.0, however, a permanently-installed Pedal Assist Sensor monitors how fast the rider is pedaling, while integrated software also keeps track of the speed at which the motor is running.

By analyzing that data, the Rubbee is able to determine how fast the bicycle is traveling. It then determines how much assistance it should provide, both in order to maintain the preferred cadence and the desired speed ... up to a maximum of 25 km/h (16 mph).

Other improvements include a 300-gram (10.6-oz)-lighter weight of 6.9 kg (15 lb), 30 percent more torque and a 35 percent increase in range, which takes it up to approximately 40 km (25 miles).

It's available now, for US$1,190.

Source: Rubbee

View gallery - 6 images
17 comments
S Michael
$1,190 USD are you kidding me.. I realize there are thousands of Americans that have more money than brains, but who in his right mind would pay that much for an un_proven device such as this. Lots I guess or it would be for sale. Good luck...
Threesixty
The price is compatible with getting an old 25cc 2-stroke, fixing the carburettor (read up on Walbro carbs), and then mounting it along with fuel tank and controls. An old Villiers or Seagull 2-stroke may be a better choice; put aside some weeks or months of fiddling around. $1190 for what appears to be a very sophisticated electronic version is a good price.
Deres
Effectively, it is a bit expensive.
In my opinion, a simpler and cheaper electronic system should be used, maybe with some mode to be preset before going (hills, flat, heavy assist, ...). I don't understand why they incorporate the battery near the seat. It could be put everywhere on the bike linked by a cable. This would provide more stability and the possibility to change batteries if more range or more assist is needed.
Nick 1801
I agree that this is too expensive. Electric crank motors appear to be cheaper, and are better because they allow you to put the motor's drive through the bike's gears. Also, you can keep your mudguards, and don't need to be covered in muck.
Aross
This just sounds like an expensive version of the old Solex gas powered bike assist, except a bit more environmentally friendly. If this doesn't self charge the battery when coasting down hill it is just an expensive toy.
Phillip Noe
$1190??? What tha?
Stuart Wilshaw
£760 in my currency, no way! At that price it's just an overpriced toy. I saw the same principle applied using a 50cc petrol engine back in the 1950s and I'm sure it can be done now for less than the asking price of this gizmo.
CaptD
Way TOO expensive and would make an easy target for thieves.
I hope someone like TESLA and/or ZERO Cycle offers a big prize for the best eBicycle design, that way many would put on their thinking caps and the result would remove huge numbers of cars from our too crowded streets.
steveraxx
It would not be an internet message board without a series of negative comments.
Great idea guys, good execution and already improving the product. A product which is one of a kind and so high initial up-front cost. What did those first automobiles cost? They were so inexpensive that just about everyone purchased one. They were so reliable that no one had issues or thought they were a waste and dangerous or too expensive!
Again great idea, especially for someone like me who has multiple bikes.
David Finney
About $200, I'd consider it a reasonable price. North of that, nope.