Home Entertainment

Samsung introduces vertical TV for Millennials

Samsung introduces vertical TV...
The Samsung Sero (right) along with the Serif, which we've covered previously
The Samsung Sero (right) along with the Serif, which we've covered previously
View 3 Images
The Sero's screen can be rotated 90 degrees, into landscape mode
1/3
The Sero's screen can be rotated 90 degrees, into landscape mode
The Samsung Sero (right) along with the Serif, which we've covered previously
2/3
The Samsung Sero (right) along with the Serif, which we've covered previously
The Samsung Sero displays content from smartphones, using their mirror mode feature
3/3
The Samsung Sero displays content from smartphones, using their mirror mode feature

Although many people have fought to get smartphone videographers to shoot everything in landscape mode (horizontally), it appears that the battle has been lost. The proof? Samsung has unveiled a QLED TV designed for Millennials, that has a vertical screen.

Possibly the same model that the company teased back in 2013, the new TV is known as the Sero, which is Japanese for "cello." It was created mainly as a means of displaying visuals streamed by NFC (near field communication) from the user's smartphone. Those visuals could include videos shot by the user, or things such as vertically-oriented games and mobile websites – really, anything that appears in portrait format on a phone's screen.

That said, the Sero's 43-inch screen can be rotated sideways for viewing of more traditional landscape-format content. There's no word on video resolution, although the TV does incorporate a 4.1-channel, 60-watt "high-end" speaker, which can be used to play streamed or downloaded music transmitted from the phone.

The Samsung Sero displays content from smartphones, using their mirror mode feature
The Samsung Sero displays content from smartphones, using their mirror mode feature

When not in use, the Sero displays images such as a clock face, photos, or other nice-to-look-at pictures. Once it's go-time, users can control it using either an included remote, or by using voice commands that are interpreted by the TV's Samsung-specific Bixby AI system.

If you're interested in getting a Sero, you'll have to go to South Korea to get one. It will be released there at the end of May, priced at 1.9 million won (about US$1,630).

Samsung, incidentally, is no stranger to the world of unusual TV technology. Previous examples have included the piece-of-art-like Serif TV, along with Ambient Mode, which allows the company's wall-mounted QLED TVs to blend in with their background.

Source: Samsung

6 comments
exodous
I actually do think computer monitors should do this, I have a small 13" screen I salvaged from an old notebook I keep in portrait that I have chat windows and such but a TV?!? I don't think this will end up selling that well. I really think if you see people taking a picture in portrait you should just walk up and slap them. Or, better yet, Apple and Samsung shouldn't allow video or photos to be shot in portrait unless you turn off a auto rotation of the picture/video when it's being held wrong. And yes, portrait is wrong. . .
ryan61
Only $1,630 for a TV only useful to watch wrongly shot (portrait) YouTube clips, what a steal! I don't think this product merited an article.
midas
Sorry guys. Millennial or not, our brains are hardwired for horizontal peripheral viewing. That's not something you can switch off in a couple of generations.
Brian M
To be fair although millennials have a lot to apologise for (!) - portrait syndrome is non-generational. Why is beyond be, but guess that is the way phones are normally held. Never see 'real' cameras used in this way and they do still exist complete with zoom etc.
Mark K.
"That said, the Sero's 43-inch screen can be rotated sideways for viewing of more traditional landscape-format content." smh
Mark K.
https://www.engadget.com/2018/09/06/mirror-fitness/ Ohh ye of little vision.