Urban Transport

Riders of new Segway unicycle will need "fearless mindset"

The single-wheeled Segway will take a bit more getting used to than the two-wheeled Segway
The single-wheeled Segway will take a bit more getting used to than the two-wheeled Segway
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The 25-lb (11.3 kg) Segway One S1 can hold up to 220 lb (100 kg)
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The 25-lb (11.3 kg) Segway One S1 can hold up to 220 lb (100 kg)
The Segway One S1 has up to 15 miles of range per charge
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The Segway One S1 has up to 15 miles of range per charge
The Segway One S1 requires use of the Ninebot App
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The Segway One S1 requires use of the Ninebot App
Segway plans to showcase its new  One S1 at CES in January
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Segway plans to showcase its new  One S1 at CES in January
Users of the One S1 can preset speed limits and customize the unit’s lighting
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Users of the One S1 can preset speed limits and customize the unit’s lighting
The UL has certified the Segway One S1 as meeting its 2272 standards
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The UL has certified the Segway One S1 as meeting its 2272 standards
The Segway One S1 is a self-balancing, electric unicycle
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The Segway One S1 is a self-balancing, electric unicycle
The Segway One S1's lighting can be customized via an app
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The Segway One S1's lighting can be customized via an app
The single-wheeled Segway will take a bit more getting used to than the two-wheeled Segway
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The single-wheeled Segway will take a bit more getting used to than the two-wheeled Segway

Since being introduced in 2001, the Segway PT has carved out a place for itself in various niche markets, from tourism to law enforcement. With the One S1, Segway appears to be targeting even more niche markets with a single-wheel design that, although self-balancing, the company warns "is not for everyone" and takes some skill to ride. Prospective riders may now get a chance to see if it is for them before slapping down their hard-earned, with Segway announcing the One S1 will roll into bricks and mortar retailers across North America.

Segway put the One S1 up for preorder on Amazon last month, but maybe the idea of being unable to try before you buy kept sales numbers down, because now the company is bringing the self-balancing, electric, single-wheel vehicle to specialized retailers in North America that cater to "lifestyle and recreational riders."

Segway says the One S1 is "challenging" to ride, but that "riders with acertain skill set, combined with a fearless mindset, can learn to ride in about an hour." So, those without a certain skill set and of the less fearless persuasion may take longer to get up to speed. That speed is a maximum of 12.5 mph (20 km/h), which is adjustable via the Ninebot App running on a smartphone and connecting to the vehicle via Bluetooth.

The 25-lb (11.3 kg) Segway One S1 can hold up to 220 lb (100 kg)
The 25-lb (11.3 kg) Segway One S1 can hold up to 220 lb (100 kg)

In addition to allowing riders to preset speed limits, the app also has a New Rider Tutorial and enables customization of the unit's lighting. The app can also switch the device to "carry" or "lock" mode. At 25 lb (11.3 kg) and with the foot holds folding into the side of the wheel, the One S1 is extremely portable and can hold up to 220 lb (100 kg). It is powered by two 150-Wh batteries, which give it a range of up to 15 mi (24 km) per charge.

Independent science safety company UL has certified the Segway One S1 as meeting its 2272 standards. Published on November 21, 2016, this new standard covers personal mobility devices that are electrically-powered, single-rider, non-roadworthy devices. The standards cover electrical safety and fire safety requirements for these devices.

In early Q1, Segway will offer various accessories for the One S1, including training wheels, a kickstand, protective bumpers, and graphic decals. The company will also be showcasing the device at CES in January, where a new black model will be revealed.

Preorder prices begin at US$749 and special Amazon-only pricing of $599 is currently being offered.

Segway introduces the One S1 in the video below.

Source: Segway (PDF), UL

Ninebot One S1 by Segway

5 comments
Alengoner
Riders of new Segway unicycle will need "fearless mindset" and good dental insurance.
Larry Hooten
Does Johnny Hart get a percentage? ;) https://www.searchlock.com/search?safe=&start=0&qn=&tbm=isch&sr=unknown&q=johnny+hart+thor#
PlanetPapi
It took me more than a week to get used to it ( not just an hour like the article mentioned). Realistically that's the time you need to set aside to ride these things with command. And of course you need all the safety gear like helmet, wrist bands, knee pads etc. There were dozens of "face plant" incidents due to malfunctions and of course user errors too. Good Amazon pricing though.
Milton
I was confident on one of these in a matter of 30 seconds. It was a lot of fun. Riding unicycles weekly probably helped. ;-)
mhpr262
It took me a lot longer than an hour to learn how to ride my EUC (electric unicycle). And even though I am a a huge fan of the general idea behind these things I haven't ridden mine for more than five weeks now, after I have rolled my ankle in a get-off worse than I ever have rolled an ankle before. Those things aren't toys, don't take them lightly. Always wear protective gear when riding, especially sturdy oots, knee and wrist protectors and a helmet.
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