Automotive

Autonomous truck platoons to roll into Singapore's ports

Scania's self-driving trucks might soon handle the heavy lifting in Singapore's ports
Scania's self-driving trucks might soon handle the heavy lifting in Singapore's ports
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Scania's self-driving trucks could have a part to play in Singapore's shipping port operations
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Scania's self-driving trucks could have a part to play in Singapore's shipping port operations
Scania's self-driving trucks might soon handle the heavy lifting in Singapore's ports
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Scania's self-driving trucks might soon handle the heavy lifting in Singapore's ports
Singapore is looking to address what it sees as a labor shortage in the trucking industry through the use of so-called autonomous truck platooning technology
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Singapore is looking to address what it sees as a labor shortage in the trucking industry through the use of so-called autonomous truck platooning technology

Singapore seems to be embracing autonomous driving technologies as well as anyone, conducting the world's first public trials of self-driving taxis in August and testing the software on closed circuits well before that. Now it is looking to bring the benefits of autonomy to its busy shipping ports, with the Ministry of Transport announcing a partnership with Toyota and Scania to develop and test a truck platooning system that hauls loads from one terminal to another.

Back in August 2014, the Committee on Autonomous Road Transport in Singapore was formed for the purposes of fast-tracking self-driving technologies in four areas in particular. These included fixed services like bus routes, on-demand and shared services for last-mile travel, utility operations and freight.

With trials testing startup nuTonomy's specially-fitted vehicles now underway, Singapore is aiming to roll out a full-fledged autonomous taxi service in 2018. And now it is looking to address what it sees as a labor shortage in the trucking industry through the use of so-called autonomous truck platooning technology.

Singapore is looking to address what it sees as a labor shortage in the trucking industry through the use of so-called autonomous truck platooning technology
Singapore is looking to address what it sees as a labor shortage in the trucking industry through the use of so-called autonomous truck platooning technology

This kind of system would involve a convoy of autonomous trucks that transport containers from one port terminal to another, with one human-driven truck leading the pack. So in that way it will be a little different to some of the other self-driving truck trials to take place recently, like Volvo's autonomous truck that navigated a dark mine, and Daimler's that hurtled down the Autobahn with an executive aboard.

The Ministry of Transport says it selected Scania and Toyota for the venture based on the quality of their proposals and their records in truck-building and developing autonomous technologies. The trials will take place over three years, with the two companies to spend the first year or so developing and testing truck platooning technologies in their own research centers in Sweden (Scania) and Japan (Toyota). This includes the ability to "fully automate the processes for precise docking and undocking of cargo."

Following this first phase, the Ministry of Transport along with the port authority will then pick one of the companies to bring the technology on-shore for local testing and further development. This second phase will be conducted along a 10 km (6.2 mi) test route, initially to haul loads between two specific terminals with a view to later scaling it up for use in other port areas.

"Trucking as we know it today is a highly labor-intensive industry," said Mr Pang Kin Keong, Permanent Secretary for Transport and Chairman of the Committee on Autonomous Road Transport in Singapore. "We face a shortage of truck drivers. In this regard, truck platooning technology presents us with an opportunity to boost productivity in both the port sector and the trucking industry. It will also open up opportunities for truck drivers to take on higher-skilled roles as fleet operators and managers."

Source: Ministry of Transport (PDF)

2 comments
MD
Great example of justifying economic rationalism. I am all for robotics (I am an Engineer with experience in these areas). Saying that there is a shortage of drivers is like saying Malaysia is a fully developed country. Singapore is in the position where they have all the cake and are unwilling to share any of it. Lack of "Skilled labour" (If truck driving can actually be classified as such) is usually a lack of willingness by companies to train said labourforce, or bureaucratic "bar-raising" and "hoop-jumping", to the point where nobody who hasn't been doing it for 10 years is unable to become qualified to perform the job. Yes robots should perform with less downtime (in a well designed system) and over a number of years -Malaysian, Thai, Indonesian or Cambodian drivers could arguably be cheaper than robots if the trucks have a limited lifespan- recoup the investment through lack of wages.. It is all about money and the ability to move freight without employing Visa Toting Foreigners (in the case of Singapore) without being accused by Amnesty International of Trampling/Violating the worker's Human rights... Ok AI doesn't like underpaying and under housing immigrant workers. fine don't employ them at all, bring on the robots that means more work for me. UAE and S-Arabia etc. should roll them out (robots, transport/construction/manufacturing/etc) too and sent all those gainfully employed foreign virtual slaves home penniless too... Lets make the non/low-skilled workforce of the world unemployed and see the consequences over the coming decades. Immigration Problem Europe/North America anyone??
habakak
Unless you are driving for fun, driving is a waste of life. As far as automating jobs away, well, truck driving as a job did not exist 125 years ago. All things come and go. We have to deal with it. People have learnt not to complain about the loss of farming jobs over time.... Trucking is vastly different than driving cars. Driving cars (personally or being a cab driver) involves getting a functioning human from point A to point B. Once it arrives, it can operate independently. Not so much with trucking which involves hauling cargo. Once freight arrives at it destination, only half the job is done. What happens outside of the driving will not be automated away by autonomous trucks. So truckers are not going to disappear. If anything, through autonomous trucking we will require less drivers per trip/truck, but we'd be able to move more cargo by employing more trucks and thus more truckers (albeit at a lower percentage of driver per truck/load). It will also not be a job that wastes your soul away since it will involve more high-end value and thus more education. As is always the case. Today the population on average is much higher schooled than 100 years ago because our jobs require it. If not you get left behind. Where we do fall short it to make more training available instead of just unemployment income.