Tiny Houses

Simple Home sprouts legs to stand its ground

Simple Home sprouts legs to st...
Simple Home by Gerhard Feldbacher (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
Simple Home by Gerhard Feldbacher (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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The bathroom/wet room area (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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The bathroom/wet room area (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
Austrian Gerhard Feldbacher recently built a tiny house that strikes a good balance between portability and size (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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Austrian Gerhard Feldbacher recently built a tiny house that strikes a good balance between portability and size (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
Inside the Simple Home (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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Inside the Simple Home (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
Simple Home comes with a grid hookup as standard, but solar power is an option too (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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Simple Home comes with a grid hookup as standard, but solar power is an option too (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
The version featured in this article, Home to Go, measures roughly 7.5 m (24 ft) long, 2.6 m (8.5 ft) wide, and 4 m (13 ft) high (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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The version featured in this article, Home to Go, measures roughly 7.5 m (24 ft) long, 2.6 m (8.5 ft) wide, and 4 m (13 ft) high (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
The bedroom area is manually pulled out from the main body of the home (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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The bedroom area is manually pulled out from the main body of the home (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
Steps lead up to the home (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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Steps lead up to the home (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
Austrian Gerhard Feldbacher recently built a tiny house that strikes a good balance between portability and size (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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Austrian Gerhard Feldbacher recently built a tiny house that strikes a good balance between portability and size (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
Austrian Gerhard Feldbacher recently built a tiny house that strikes a good balance between portability and size (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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Austrian Gerhard Feldbacher recently built a tiny house that strikes a good balance between portability and size (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
There's space inside the walls for batteries and technical equipment (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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There's space inside the walls for batteries and technical equipment (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
Inside the Simple Home (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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Inside the Simple Home (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
The bedroom area is manually pulled out from the main body of the home (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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The bedroom area is manually pulled out from the main body of the home (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
The wet room has a toilet and shower (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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The wet room has a toilet and shower (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
Inside the Simple Home (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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Inside the Simple Home (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
A small suspended terrace and sliding doors help open up the home to the outside (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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A small suspended terrace and sliding doors help open up the home to the outside (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
Feldbacher told Gizmag that Simple Home uses a Swap Body system, like those usually used in container transport (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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Feldbacher told Gizmag that Simple Home uses a Swap Body system, like those usually used in container transport (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
The version featured in this article, Home to Go, measures roughly 7.5 m (24 ft) long, 2.6 m (8.5 ft) wide, and 4 m (13 ft) high (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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The version featured in this article, Home to Go, measures roughly 7.5 m (24 ft) long, 2.6 m (8.5 ft) wide, and 4 m (13 ft) high (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
A larger Home To Stay version is not transportable (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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A larger Home To Stay version is not transportable (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
A larger Home To Stay version is not transportable (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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A larger Home To Stay version is not transportable (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
Simple Home by Gerhard Feldbacher (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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Simple Home by Gerhard Feldbacher (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
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Austrian Gerhard Feldbacher recently unveiled an interesting small home that aims to strike a happy balance between ease of transport and size. Named Simple Home, the small dwelling sports four integrated legs that enable it to be easily transported by truck and left in its intended location without the need of a crane, hoist, or other machinery.

The model featured in this article measures roughly 7.5 m (24 ft) long, 2.6 m (8.5 ft) wide, and 4 m (13 ft) high. Though it somewhat resembles the shipping container homes we've covered, it's actually built from wood, and features 10 cm (4 in) thick wooden walls and roof, and a larch ventilated facade. Insulation comes in the form of wood fiber insulation (sheep's wool is optional too), and the whole thing weighs in at a rather heavy 10,000 kg (11 US tons).

The interior looks reasonably roomy and includes a kitchen unit, lounge area, and wet room bathroom with sink, toilet, and shower head. The bedroom area is novel, and consists of a pop-out unit that sits on wheels and is pulled out manually from the main body of the home. Access to the home is gained via steps, and a terrace and sliding doors help open it up to the outside.

The version featured in this article, Home to Go, measures roughly 7.5 m (24 ft) long, 2.6 m (8.5 ft) wide, and 4 m (13 ft) high (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
The version featured in this article, Home to Go, measures roughly 7.5 m (24 ft) long, 2.6 m (8.5 ft) wide, and 4 m (13 ft) high (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)

The home features a swap body system, very much like those used to transport some containers. It's low-tech and works as follows ... once the flatbed truck which Simple House sits upon has reached its intended location, the home's four long legs are unfolded, thus allowing it to stand under its own weight and the truck to drive away. To move the home again, the process is reversed.

Simple Home can run from either a grid hookup or, optionally, an off-grid solar-based power system, and Feldbacher put it through its paces while traveling around Central Europe and attending festivals last year. As standard, water comes from a hookup and waste water can be connected to a sewer or tank.

The bedroom area is manually pulled out from the main body of the home (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)
The bedroom area is manually pulled out from the main body of the home (Photo: Gerhard Feldbacher)

Feldbacher is selling the Simple Home (price on request), and offers a lot of options, including different materials and interior layout, and a larger version dubbed Home to Stay that's not designed to be moved.

Source: Simple Home via TreeHugger

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3 comments
Bob
So much wasted space. A few wall cabinets would greatly add to the usefulness. If it were slightly higher on the stilts, the area underneath could be a shade area or even a carport.
Tom Lee Mullins
I think that is a nice design. It would make for not really having a big foundation since it would just be needed for the posts?
I like Bob's ideas too. I think it would improve the design.
John Banister
If they could integrate wastewater treatment, this might be a nice house for places where the local ecology would make it hard to get a permit to dig a traditional foundation.