Automotive

Slamstop pulls car doors closed, so you don't have to slam 'em

A cut-away view of a car door with the Slamstop device installed
A cut-away view of a car door with the Slamstop device installed
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A cut-away view of a car door with the Slamstop device installed
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A cut-away view of a car door with the Slamstop device installed
An added slot is reportedly the only visible sign that the Slamstop has been added
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An added slot is reportedly the only visible sign that the Slamstop has been added
The Slamstop device
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The Slamstop device

At some point or another, you've probably half-heartedly swung your car's passenger door closed, only to see the "door ajar" light come on once you're on the road. In some cases, this can even result in the door swinging open while driving. Slamming the doors shut is one option, although Slamstop is designed to be a quieter alternative.

The Slamstop device is installed within the door panel, and senses when the door is almost closed. It then softly pulls it completely closed, and latches it securely. As an added bonus, the door will retract if the sensor detects there's an obstacle in the way of the door closing, so childrens' fingers are safe from being closed on.

An added slot is reportedly the only visible sign that the Slamstop has been added
An added slot is reportedly the only visible sign that the Slamstop has been added

If it sounds familiar, it's likely because Slamstop has been featured in some higher-end automobiles over the past few years. It's now newly available in the US as an after-market kit, however, for any make or model of vehicle (including those with sliding doors). Pricing for all doors of a four-door car ranges from US$800 to $1,000, installation included.

You can see it in use, in the video below.

Source: Slamstop

SlamStop. How it works

6 comments
Chris Maresca
Strange - most high-end cars already have this. You close the door and it shuts the last 1/4 or so automatically...
ASHDIL
that's what the article says...higher end cars are already using it....nothing strange about that. I think the point the author was trying to make, if i read correctly, was that the option is now available as an after sales product for the average car owner. I understand the need to price things given the fact that a lot of research and development goes into stuff before they are brought to a roll-out phase, the question in my mind is: Is the price worthy of the effort in being more aware when closing a car door - and what happens during a malfunction???.....I like the thing about the kiddies fingers though....good stuff. Cheers ASHDIL
Mirmillion
I hope it can be adjusted after its installed. I saw some uneven gaps between door and body of vehicles in this video...or was this a factor of the car manufacturer's original clearance i.e., after the door is latched the Slam Stop is disengaged entirely? Great product though.
LoveLearn
Is this significantly different from the same functional configuration provided in Lincoln cars I've owned at least as far back as 30 years ago? Those just pulled the trunk lid shut when a person pushed the lid almost closed. Swapping that over to pulling doors closed is some great new innovation? Not to me.
Adrian Pineda
My 2007 S600 has this on all doors and trunk.
Amanda Matthews
Now give me a button that re-closes the trunk when I accidently press the trunk open button instead of the door unlock button.