Outdoors

Snolo Scion offers a less-costly alternative to carbon fiber sledding

Two Snolo Scions, ready to hit the slopes
Two Snolo Scions, ready to hit the slopes
View 5 Images
Two Snolo Scions, ready to hit the slopes
1/5
Two Snolo Scions, ready to hit the slopes
Users steer with their feet, leaning and carving into corners, and stopping by carving harder – as on a snowboard
2/5
Users steer with their feet, leaning and carving into corners, and stopping by carving harder – as on a snowboard
The Scion features a sleek, body-hugging monocoque shell, a front ski with foot pegs, and an arm connecting the two
3/5
The Scion features a sleek, body-hugging monocoque shell, a front ski with foot pegs, and an arm connecting the two
It features a waterproof nylon-covered high-density foam seat, replaceable polished stainless steel/alloy runners, and a shock coil lanyard to keep it from getting away from you
4/5
It features a waterproof nylon-covered high-density foam seat, replaceable polished stainless steel/alloy runners, and a shock coil lanyard to keep it from getting away from you
Should users wish to tweak its handling characteristics, they can do so by adjusting the balance point of the front ski
5/5
Should users wish to tweak its handling characteristics, they can do so by adjusting the balance point of the front ski

Back in 2012, we first heard about the Stealth-X carbon fiber sled. Designed by New Zealand-based company Snolo, it was designed to be fast, light and maneuverable. Unfortunately for most of us, it also cost US$2,999. Now, however, Snolo is ready to begin production on a much more affordable plastic version of the sled, known as the Scion.

Like the Stealth-X, the Scion features a sleek, body-hugging monocoque shell, a front ski with foot pegs, and an arm connecting the two. Users steer with their feet, leaning and carving into corners, and stopping by carving harder – as on a snowboard.

Whereas the Stealth-X is made entirely from carbon fiber, however, the Scion is made from fiber-reinforced high-density polyethylene. It also features a waterproof nylon-covered high-density foam seat, replaceable polished stainless steel/alloy runners, and a shock coil lanyard to keep it from getting away from you. Its total weight is 7.5 kg (16.5 lb), as compared to the Stealth-X's 4 kg (9 lb).

Users steer with their feet, leaning and carving into corners, and stopping by carving harder – as on a snowboard
Users steer with their feet, leaning and carving into corners, and stopping by carving harder – as on a snowboard

Its seat back is less pronounced than that of its predecessor, allowing users to lie back in a luge-like position if they wish. That said, they can also use the thing just sitting up. Should they wish to tweak its handling characteristics, they can do so by adjusting the balance point of the front ski.

It's also possible to hook the sled up to a dog team, using built-in attachment points.

Snolo is now raising production funds for the Scion, on Kickstarter. A pledge of US$384 will get you one in your choice of black or white, when and if they're ready to go. The planned retail price is $549.

You can see the Scion in action, in the pitch video below.

Sources: Kickstarter, Snolo

Scion Kickstarter Campaign

1 comment
MD
Ben: Seems you like sensationalising things, or aren't sure about materials. "Whereas the Stealth-X is made entirely from carbon fiber, however, the Scion is made from fiber-reinforced high-density polyethylene." Nothing is made entirely of carbon fibre, that would be the reinforcing fibres you mention later in the same sentence, though in a lower cost product the fibres are more likely to be chopped fibreglass, or some other non-exotic fibre. Carbon-Fibre composites as you probably know have a significant amount of plastic in their matrix, usually in the form of an epoxy resin (though not necessarily). So really the contest is between a high strength, lightweight engineered plastic in an expensive product and a low strength, heavier or more bulky plastic in an expensive product, technically they are all plastic. (Though some people take umbrage at calling a thermoset based composite plastic thinking it reduces it to the level of a sandwich bag, just the Maybach of sandwich bags.)
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