Electronics

StickNFind system uses your phone and coin-like tags to find lost items

StickNFind system uses your ph...
One of the StickNFind tags, and the app that finds it
One of the StickNFind tags, and the app that finds it
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The StickNFind app can alert users when a tagged object moves more than a given distance away
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The StickNFind app can alert users when a tagged object moves more than a given distance away
One of the StickNFind tags, and the app that finds it
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One of the StickNFind tags, and the app that finds it
A batch of the StickNFind tags
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A batch of the StickNFind tags
Each tag contains a circuit board, a replaceable watch battery, a buzzer and an LED light
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Each tag contains a circuit board, a replaceable watch battery, a buzzer and an LED light
When the user needs to find a tagged object, a display on the phone’s screen will show them how far away it is
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When the user needs to find a tagged object, a display on the phone’s screen will show them how far away it is

If the number of “finding” systems cropping up lately is anything to go by, we seem to be quite a forgetful bunch. One of the latest such systems, known as StickNFind, looks to be particularly simple – just some little adhesive tags, and an app on the user’s smartphone.

The tags are about the size and shape of a slightly-fat U.S. quarter dollar. Each one contains a circuit board, a replaceable watch battery, a buzzer and an LED light. They also each have an adhesive backing, which allows them to be stuck to things like keys, TV remotes, or any number of other things that tend to go AWOL.

Using a custom app on a paired iOS or Android smartphone, users can assign specific tags to specific objects. Should they subsequently need to find one of those objects, a display on the phone’s screen will show them how far away it is – as long as it’s within the maximum range of about 100 feet (30 meters).

When the user needs to find a tagged object, a display on the phone’s screen will show them how far away it is
When the user needs to find a tagged object, a display on the phone’s screen will show them how far away it is

It won't show what direction the object lies in, but users can determine that by moving in different directions and seeing if they get closer or farther away from the item. They can also simply get the app to sound the buzzer, illuminate the light, or do both on the missing object’s tag.

If the object is out of range, users can instruct the app to notify them when they – and their phone – later get within its range. The app can also alert users when a tagged object moves more than a given distance away (useful if the tag is attached to a child in a shopping mall, for instance), or when they forget an object and walk away without it (also useful if the tag is attached to a child in a shopping mall, perhaps).

Up to 20 tags can be paired to one phone. When any of their batteries get low, the user will be notified via the app.

As mentioned, there are already similar systems available, such as the Gadget Hound, U Grok It, and BiKN. All three of those, however, incorporate hardware that is used either instead of a smartphone, or that the phone must be docked into.

The designers of StickNFind are currently raising production funds on Indiegogo. A pledge of US$35 will get you two tags (or “stickers,” as they’re referred to) when and if they go into production – the planned retail price for two is $49.95.

A demo of the system can be seen in the pitch video below.

Source: Indiegogo

The Stick N Find

10 comments
Maelduin
All these finding systems are fine - as long as you always lose your stuff at home. But most of us don't have such careful forethought - I've lost two sets of family keys - bike, car, house, postbox - in the last three months, each one costing €120 to replace. They probably fell out of my pocket as I cycled, or else I dropped them in a shop. When someone comes up with a finding system that works within, say 10km, then I'll sit up and whoop.
Tony Smale
Maelduin : How about putting them on a chain attached to a belt loop or similar? Saving that sort of money would be well worth the inconvinience. I can't wait until the tech is small enough to fit onto a tiny sticker.
Joseph Boe
@MMaelduin There are at least a few products in development (maybe even available now) that address this issue better then Stick N Find from your perspective 9and one with which I completely agree). TrackeR is one that comes to mind. Essentially it provides a mobile phone based virtual leash. Move a way from an item you have attached a tag or sticker to and the app beeps/flashes/etc. to alert you your leaving something behind. One of the other features of this kind of technology is that it paints the last know location of the object on your maps app. This isn't exactly a long range finder but does approximate that functionality. I have a serious case of the "left that somewhere" with my wallet, keys, sunglasses, etc. so I am actively searching for this type of product. Some keywords to search with are "BLE (bluetooth low energy)", "virtual leash" "virtual tracker". Some products are TrackerR, Artec iPower reminder (and 1 or two others by Artec I think), ZOMM and Halo Phone finder. ZOMM might be dead and the Halo might be just for phones but if you search using those keywords or for those products you'll come up with others. Good luck!
Terry Converse
Nicely except there was no mention as to how strong the stickers were. I could easily imagine then falling off a dog's collar or the back of key with the kind of use these type of items typically get.
POOL PUMPREAPAIR guy longwood
Now you can find your car when you get out of the bar.
ADVENTUREMUFFINffin
Pretty cool concept. Think it will work as a beacon for finding buried people? If so, a new market, as these normally run 100's of dollars. Good luck David
solutions4circuits
@adventuremuffin: Radio, which this uses, doesn't work for buried things, so you'll have to use your own recall to locate your victims' bodies :-p
Stewart Mitchell
A postman could use this to locate a post box
kellory
Maelduin "If the object is out of range, users can instruct the app to notify them when they – and their phone – later get within its range. The app can also alert users when a tagged object moves more than a given distance away (useful if the tag is attached to a child in a shopping mall, for instance), or when they forget an object and walk away without it (also useful if the tag is attached to a child in a shopping mall, perhaps)." This product will do that for you. It will alert you when the keys drop out of range, and will alert you when you go back over your route and guide you to them when you get in range of them (100feet)
bergamot69
Great idea for finding things. If only I hadn't lost my smartphone...