Bicycles

Sync bike definitely won't get mistaken for another

Sync bike definitely won't get...
The Sync's frame design is inspired by the shape of a rider in the aerodynamic "tucked" position
The Sync's frame design is inspired by the shape of a rider in the aerodynamic "tucked" position
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The Sync's frame is definitely eye-catching, although it reportedly also offers strength and stability while still allowing some natural flexibility
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The Sync's frame is definitely eye-catching, although it reportedly also offers strength and stability while still allowing some natural flexibility
The Sync frameset with fork weighs 5.2 kg (11.5 lb), while the complete bike tips the scales at 9.8 kg (21.6 lb)
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The Sync frameset with fork weighs 5.2 kg (11.5 lb), while the complete bike tips the scales at 9.8 kg (21.6 lb)
The Sync's frame design is inspired by the shape of a rider in the aerodynamic "tucked" position
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The Sync's frame design is inspired by the shape of a rider in the aerodynamic "tucked" position
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While things like comfort, light weight and durability are important considerations when selecting a bike, it is OK to want one that looks unique, too. If you place a lot of emphasis on the latter, then the Sync might be for you.

As can be seen, the Sync's steel frame takes the form of what its British designers call a "double S." Although it's definitely eye-catching, they claim that it also offers strength and stability while still allowing some natural flexibility.

The Sync frameset with fork weighs 5.2 kg (11.5 lb), while the complete bike tips the scales at 9.8 kg (21.6 lb)
The Sync frameset with fork weighs 5.2 kg (11.5 lb), while the complete bike tips the scales at 9.8 kg (21.6 lb)

If its looks aren't polarizing enough, it also has no brakes or gears – its reversible rear hub allows it to be used in fixed-gear or freewheeling single-speed modes. The frameset with fork weighs 5.2 kg (11.5 lb), while the complete bike tips the scales at 9.8 kg (21.6 lb).

Sync Bicycles has already been making Syncs in small batches, since the bike was unveiled at the Excel London Bike Show in February. The company is now looking to increase production, however, and has turned to Kickstarter for funding. If all goes according to plans, backers can get a frameset for a pledge of £499 (about US$764) or a complete bike for £899 ($1,376).

You can see the Sync in action, in the video below.

Source: Kickstarter

New Cool Fixed Gear Bike from Sync Bicycles - Kickstarter Launch 1st Sept 2015!

View gallery - 3 images
9 comments
9 comments
Freyr Gunnar
No front brake makes it illegal in some countries.
Besides, a single speed is just not enough for most people: You need at least three (one to start from a full-stop, one to cruise, and one to ride up-hill). A three-speed internal gear hub would solve this without changing its look.
StWils
Freyr is right. How is it possible that having no brakes or even fewer brakes somehow seems like an innovation? Would'nt the advantage of brakes on both wheels be pretty much obvious on the first stop in traffic? Even Homer Simpson would catch this big clue.
Bob Flint
The seat post looks like a cling-on....
$1400 bucks for an ugly suicide machine with a single gear and no brakes, skip the seat, loud the tubes with lead and charge another $2000 as a lawn ornament...
Pat Pending
Just a thought but how does one stop with no breaks in freewheel mode?
Mark Salamon
It's lovely to look at, and the basic design might even offer advantages in terms of frame weight and shock absorption, but since it lacks brakes and gears it isn't actually a complete bicycle. Buyers will need to install these features themselves, adding to the bike's already extravagant cost, as well as the investment of the owner's time and effort. In a way it's unfortunate that this design is being promoted primarily for its eye-catching appearance, because from an engineering perspective it may actually represent an improvement in the traditional triangle frame, where significant technological advances have been rare. And rather than offering the potential to be widely adopted by bike makers and cyclists, it is likely to remain merely a luxury product occupying just a tiny niche in the market. I'll also point out that those tube welds had better be extraordinarily strong, for if any one of those joints break you'll be left with nothing but a piece of minimalist sculpture. Oddly enough, despite my criticisms I admire the basic concept of this design, and with improvements (and a more affordable price) I believe it could be an innovation that advances the way that bicycles are built.
bergamot69
Interesting concept but no brakes and single speed rule it out as being remotely useful. And given those limitations effectively make it a track-only bike, what is the use of the shock absorbing qualities of the frame?
Give it brakes and proper gearing, and put the seat on a sufficiently stiff leaf spring leading off the top tube, and you'd have a winner methinks.
rpark
...stylish, but $1,300 is way too much to spend for a single speed bike.
Intellcity
A fixed gear is rideable, even in traffic, but you need good legs to stop. Been there done that - for a few years while in college. Even rode some century rides on my fixed gear "commuter" bike.
A freewheel and no brakes? Someone is missing something, probably between the ears.
Three speed hubs have been made with internal brakes but I do not know of any currently making them. A hand brake would be required. Dragging your foot does not work well.
As for the frame: another oddball design looking for 15 minutes. Fix the goofy seatpost mount and you might get an hour.
What country requires a front brake?
John Kang
Cool looking bikes are just asking for trouble. Might as well put up a sign "Steal me!"