University of Twente

  • ​Getting a tattoo certainly isn't known for being a comfortable process. It can also cause damage to the skin, plus it results in bio-hazardous used needles that need to be properly disposed of. A new needle-free technique, however, gets around all of those problems.
  • ​Three years ago, the city of Los Angeles covered the surface of the LA Basin with 96 million shade-providing floating balls, in order to keep the water beneath from evaporating. Now, a new study suggests that the making of the plastic balls may have have used up more water than they saved.
  • A team of students called Electric Superbike Twente has revealed its entry into the MotoE championship with a fire-breathing 150-kW (200-hp) electric superbike. Called the Liion-GP, the bike has been assembled partially using off-the-shelf pieces, and partially with custom gear.​
  • ​One of the more debilitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease is something known as "gait freeze," wherein the person temporarily loses the ability to step forward while walking. Scientists have come up with something that significantly reduces the problem, however – shoes with lasers in them.
  • ​It's an unfortunate fact of life that as people get older, their sense of balance diminishes. This means that seniors have a higher than average risk of falling when cycling. They may be less likely to do so, however, if the senior-specific Sofie e-bike reaches production.
  • Tanker trucks are often equipped with baffles or bulkheads that divide the tank into multiple compartments. That way, when the truck stops, its liquid load won't all go sloshing forward in one big wave. Dr. Erik Eenkhoorn believes that's not enough, however … which is why he created the Cairbag.
  • ​​Microsoft's HoloLens may indeed be making augmented reality more accessible than ever before, but at a price of US$3,000 it's still not going to be accessible to everyone. It was with this in mind that a team of students from the Netherlands' University of Twente created the $30 Aryzon.
  • ​Doctoral candidate Geert Folkertsma has spent four years developing a scale robotic cheetah that is not only capable of replicating many of the real animal's movements, but in doing so uses only 15 percent more energy than the real thing.
  • ​​After stroke patients finish their programs at rehabilitation clinics, it's important to know how they progress at home. That's why a student at the University of Twente developed a sensor-laden suit that transmits data to therapists via the internet.​
  • Duchenne muscular dystrophy causes the victim's muscles to shrink throughout their lifetime, often to the point that the arms and legs can't be used at all. That's why the A-Gear project is designing two arm-worn exoskeletons, intended to help Duchenne patients retain the use of their arms.
  • A new chip design could lead to massively parallel, energy efficient computation that handles complex tasks like pattern recognition better and faster than ever before.
  • A robot-assisted system promises to make medical procedures that use needles more precise. It uses flexible needles that can be steered in real time to their target, thereby negating any issues with tissue and organ deformation that occurs during insertion.