Outdoors

Tentsile releases Vista multi-story tree tent

Tentsile releases Vista multi-...
The Vista sports a removable roof and an ability to accommodate a number of additional stories
The Vista sports a removable roof and an ability to accommodate a number of additional stories
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Just a few months after releasing its smallest, lightest, and most affordable tree tent so far, British firm Tenstile is back with another hanging tree-tent design named Vista
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Just a few months after releasing its smallest, lightest, and most affordable tree tent so far, British firm Tenstile is back with another hanging tree-tent design named Vista
The Vista will set you back US$595
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The Vista will set you back US$595
The three-man Vista is based on Tentsile's Stingray model
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The three-man Vista is based on Tentsile's Stingray model
It's suspended around 1.2 m (4 ft) off the ground, and is anchored to three nearby trees using a like number of ratchets and straps
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It's suspended around 1.2 m (4 ft) off the ground, and is anchored to three nearby trees using a like number of ratchets and straps
The Vista folds up into a bag measuring 59 x 25 x 25 cm (23 x 10 x 10 in)
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The Vista folds up into a bag measuring 59 x 25 x 25 cm (23 x 10 x 10 in)
Weight comes in at 9 kg (19 lb)
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Weight comes in at 9 kg (19 lb)
The Vista is anchored to nearby trees
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The Vista is anchored to nearby trees
Judging from the photos, you'd probably only want to use this thing in relatively warm locations as Tentsile says it can't be fully sealed fully shut
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Judging from the photos, you'd probably only want to use this thing in relatively warm locations as Tentsile says it can't be fully sealed fully shut
Just a few months after releasing its smallest, lightest, and most affordable tree tent so far, British firm Tenstile is back with yet another hanging tree-tent design called Vista
9/16
Just a few months after releasing its smallest, lightest, and most affordable tree tent so far, British firm Tenstile is back with yet another hanging tree-tent design called Vista
The Vista will set you back US$595
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The Vista will set you back US$595
The three-man Vista is based on Tentsile's Stingray model
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The three-man Vista is based on Tentsile's Stingray model
Judging from the photos, you'd probably only want to use this thing in relatively warm locations as Tentsile says it can't be fully sealed fully shut
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Judging from the photos, you'd probably only want to use this thing in relatively warm locations as Tentsile says it can't be fully sealed fully shut
Multiple "floors" can also be purchased at extra cost that allow a kind of multi-story camping setup
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Multiple "floors" can also be purchased at extra cost that allow a kind of multi-story camping setup
It's suspended around 1.2 m (4 ft) off the ground
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It's suspended around 1.2 m (4 ft) off the ground
The Vista is anchored to nearby trees using straps and ratchets
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The Vista is anchored to nearby trees using straps and ratchets
The Vista sports a removable roof and an ability to accommodate a number of additional stories
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The Vista sports a removable roof and an ability to accommodate a number of additional stories

Just a few months after releasing its smallest, lightest, and most affordable tree tent so far, British firm Tentsile is back with another off-ground tent design. The Vista is likened by Tentsile to a portable treehouse and offers more flexibility than the firm's previous tents, thanks to a removable roof and an ability to accommodate multiple stories.

The three-man (or two adults and two kids) Vista is based on Tentsile's Stingray model, and sports the same basic hammock/tent hybrid design as Tentsile's other products. It's suspended around 1.2 m (4 ft) off the ground, and is anchored to three nearby trees using a like number of ratchets and straps. Access is gained via the floor hatch in the center or the side entrances.

Multiple "floors" can also be purchased at extra cost that allow a kind of multi-story camping setup
Multiple "floors" can also be purchased at extra cost that allow a kind of multi-story camping setup

Judging from the photos, you'd probably only want to use this thing when the weather is particularly nice, and Tentsile states that it can't be fully sealed shut. On the plus side, Vista's removable roof allows one to sit back and enjoy the view. In addition, multiple floors can also be purchased at extra cost that allow a kind of multi-story off-ground camping setup.

Between deployment, the tent folds up into a bag measuring 59 x 25 x 25 cm (23 x 10 x 10 in), and weighs 9 kg (19 lb).

The Vista is available now in green, orange, camo, or dark grey, and will set you back US$595, plus shipping.

Source: Tentsile

10 comments
Jay Finke
3 times the snack'n for the bears.
rik.warren
The first level is easy to understand, but tell me how you fasten the higher levels. Oh right, a ladder is included.
Derek Hann
The few times I have slept overnight in a hammock were miserable. I froze. Sleeping on the ground can be uncomfortable, but the heat sink of the earth keeps you relatively warm . Hanging up in the air, you are fully exposed to the elements, you will get as cold as the air around you. Unless you are camping somewhere with warm nights, I don't know that this kind of tent would be all that great for overnight trips.
Jay Wilson
seems a bit inconvenient when you have to get up in the middle of the night from the top level. Oh yeah, the ladder thing. sorry...excuse me...sorry...........bears!
Keith Reeder
"3 times the snack'n for the bears." Sure - because we have LOADS of bears in the UK...
Charles Barnard
Derek Hann You probably had your hammock hung and occupied incorrectly. Don't know where you camp, but in most places outside of subtropics, ground sucks heat like crazy. Minimal set up used year-round in Wisconsin 40 years ago by my friend Dan was cot, a couple wool blankets and a tarp wrapped over it... Average ground temperature at 5' is about the average annual air temperature...
Derek Hann
Charle Barnard. It definitely depends on the application. In my case it was summer camping in North Idaho. The ground stays warm most of the night during the summer. 60 Deg F range. The air does not, drops into the 40's often. It is a classic thermodynamics problem I suppose. The ground sucks temperature from you when it is cold, but keeps you warmer when it is warm. Mass and specific heat and what not. But I don't imagine you would take this tent winter camping. It does not look like it is really designed to do that well.
Michael Wilson
I'm not so sure why their stock models were dressed in winter attire when showing off this tent because it is obviously made for warmer climates. I live in the southeastern US and a hammock tent like this would be a godsend in the hot, humid summers. Our daytime temps are around 95 - 98 deg F and at night, it may dip to 85 or 80. Even in fall, night time temps hover around 60 - 70f. A tent like this would be nice and airy, good ventilation to wick away the sweat in the summer. My only gripe is the overall lack of mosquito netting, as the mosquitos are quite ravenous in summer.
Jay Finke
@Keith Reeder.. ''Sure - because we have LOADS of bears in the UK''. OK.. huge rats then.
hellno187
@Keith Reeder, well it's a good thing we all live in the UK and these tents won't be sold anywhere else. Brilliant point!