Energy

Construction of the world's biggest Li-ion battery completed

The 129 MWh Powerpack system is the largest Li-ion battery storage project in the world
The 129 MWh Powerpack system is the largest Li-ion battery storage project in the world
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The 129 MWh Powerpack system is the largest Li-ion battery storage project in the world
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The 129 MWh Powerpack system is the largest Li-ion battery storage project in the world

Back in March, Tesla's Elon Musk promised to have a proposed battery storage system at the Hornsdale Wind Farm in South Australia up and running within 100 days, or he'd foot the bill. The project clock started ticking in September and the deadline for the big switch on is December 1, and South Australia's Premier Jay Weatherill has today confirmed that it's built and ready to "be energized."

Weatherill has confirmed that the Tesla Powerpacks have been fully installed on site and connected to the Hornsdale Wind Farm, and are now undergoing testing to make sure that the batteries meet standards set by the Australian Energy Market Operator and the South Australian Government. The Premier is set to join company reps to officially launch the battery storage facility next week.

"While others are just talking, we are delivering our energy plan, making South Australia more self-sufficient, and providing back up power and more affordable energy for South Australians this summer," said Weatherill. "The world's largest lithium ion battery will be an important part of our energy mix, and it sends the clearest message that South Australia will be a leader renewable energy with battery storage."

When it goes live, the 129 MWh Powerpack system will be capable of meeting on-demand power delivery for more than 30,000 homes.

Source: Premier of South Australia

4 comments
christopher
For those wondering, the price is secret at Tesla's request, but supposedly about $50M, and has been announced already as "less than $150M" (being the size of a SA renewable energy fund). A retail battery wall costs just under $1 per watt hour, so for 129 MWh installed in your home it's certainly less than AUD $129M.
Glen Thompson
I do hope this amazing venture is successful as it promises to reduce SA's dependence on limited, fragile connections from interstate, valuable though they are. I wonder at the amount of electronics needed to convert this amount of power into the high-voltage 3-phase AC needed for transmission. I assume they've got it right and it doesn't need the AC synchronization that gave our wind farms so much trouble in 2016 when the transmission lines blew over and the last remaining line overloaded.
watersworm
How many "homes" /people in SA? Therefore how many "packs" needed for safe electricity power supply ? Therefore how long for lithium mining ability?
Bob Stuart
Why lithium? Are foundations the most expensive part? Is this going to be begging for a re-build with newer technology next year?
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