Architecture

Wooden high-rise planned for Stockholm

Wooden high-rise planned for S...
If the project goes ahead it will rise to a height of 20 stories and include 240 apartments that overlook the port of Loudden, Stockholm (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
If the project goes ahead it will rise to a height of 20 stories and include 240 apartments that overlook the port of Loudden, Stockholm (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
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The high-rise buildings will be constructed entirely in Swedish solid wood, including the frame, facade, finishes and window frames (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
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The high-rise buildings will be constructed entirely in Swedish solid wood, including the frame, facade, finishes and window frames (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
A 1,000 sq m (10,763 sq ft) solar panel array will be installed on the roof to provide electricity (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
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A 1,000 sq m (10,763 sq ft) solar panel array will be installed on the roof to provide electricity (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
If the project goes ahead it will rise to a height of 20 stories and include 240 apartments that overlook the port of Loudden, Stockholm (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
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If the project goes ahead it will rise to a height of 20 stories and include 240 apartments that overlook the port of Loudden, Stockholm (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
Architectural drawing of the planned development (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
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Architectural drawing of the planned development (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
Architectural drawing of the planned development (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
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Architectural drawing of the planned development (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
Architectural drawing of the planned development (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
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Architectural drawing of the planned development (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
Architectural drawing of the planned development (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
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Architectural drawing of the planned development (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
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Stockholm's Tham & Videgård Arkitekter has proposed four interconnected high-rise apartment blocks constructed from wood. Still in the planning stage at present, if the project goes ahead it will rise to a height of 20 stories and include 240 apartments that overlook the sea in Loudden, a former busy international harbor in Stockholm that's currently under redevelopment.

The firm designed the unnamed residential development, which comprises a total floorspace of 24,700 sq m (265,868 sq ft), as four separate towers with significant gaps in-between each tower rather than a large block so as to not completely block the view toward the sea for other nearby buildings. This also enables sunlight to reach a nearby quay promenade. Each tower is connected by a three-story base that's angled to create sheltered exterior spaces suitable for outdoor activities and features sedum plants to reduce stormwater runoff.

A 1,000 sq m (10,763 sq ft) solar panel array will be installed on the roof to provide electricity (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)
A 1,000 sq m (10,763 sq ft) solar panel array will be installed on the roof to provide electricity (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)

If all goes well and it's actually built, the project will be constructed entirely from Swedish solid wood, says the firm, including the frame, facade, window frames, doors, and finishes. A rooftop garden will top each tower and a 1,000 sq m (10,763 sq ft) solar panel array will also be installed on the roofs to provide electricity, though Tham & Videgård Arkitekter told us that it hasn't yet worked out how much juice this can be expected to produce.

We've discussed the benefits and drawbacks of constructing tall buildings with wood in greater detail previously, and for the project to be realized, Tham & Videgård Arkitekter will need to deal with not inconsiderable challenges, especially with regard to city planners and the perceived increased risk of fire.

On this note, a company representative told Gizmag that it's now in the local municipality's hands as to whether or not the project goes ahead. If the green light is given, construction is expected to take around four years.

Source: Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

View gallery - 7 images
10 comments
TeZ
Just when I was thinking that wood was in short supply...?
James Donohue
Does this require an amendment to the Building Code?
Jim Sadler
In an age in which terror attacks are fairly common a wooden high rise is simply not a wise notion.
Theron G. Burrough
Why not chocolate?
kmccune
Please tell me this building is fireproof.
Bob
Humidity, expansion, termites, mold, and fire come to mind. After a few years as the larger timbers begin to split, considerable maintenance will be needed to keep the buildings structurally sound. I used to work in a large wooden framed 100 year old 150 foot tall six story warehouse. Replacing rotting wood was a full time job and boy did it burn after it was closed when some vagrant built a fire inside to keep warm. Flames were visible for 20 miles and it was all the fire departments could do to save nearby buildings up to a block away and unfortunately several elderly people died who lived nearby. Something like this 20 stories high will be a death trap.
Bruce Williams
Wonder how it would look tented for termites?
Andrew Keim
This highrise would be susceptible for TERMITES!!! Who in their right mind would live in this thing long-term? honestly? Dead wood is also susceptible to some bacteria which cause the wood to break down at a rapid rate, also certain borer beetles eat wood, among all of the other animals and insects. Wood also BURNS, and treated wood to prevent bug infestations increases how flammable wood IS, so that building would burn down so fast probably before the song "BURN" finishes playing. How about instead of using wood, they buy one of those giant building concrete printers and just print a building out of concrete and wire-mesh? Or better yet use crude carbon nanotubes impregnated into the cement and voilà! cement stronger than diamond. The rainforests are dying at an amazing rate, stop killing the planet.
Mike Giles
So what was wrong with steel and concrete? It seems like they are a few steps backward in technology.
Ken Riddle
Maybe they should consider adding a fire-resistant coating such as this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPsd12tqC20&feature=em-share_video_user